Participants

Alain Bernard Alain Bernard
Professional swimmer
Athletics roundtable : Can we beat time?

Alain Bernard is a former French swimmer from Aubagne, Bouches-du-Rhône. Bernard won a total of four medals (two golds, one silver, and one bronze) at two Olympic Games (2008 and 2012). He also won numerous medals at the World Championships (short course and long course) and European Championships (short course and long course). Bernard formerly held the world record for the 50 metres freestyle (long course) and the 100 metres freestyle (long course and short course).
Athletics roundtable : Can we beat time?
23 novembre 2019 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Athletes are always looking to push their limits, to surpass themselves and beat out the competition. Most of them also try to be as far ahead as possible, even trying to beat the stopwatch. The purpose is to train to the point where they have total control over their body allowing them to excel in their specialty. Like a conductor, the top athlete is a coordinator. The athlete keeps their breathing and the rhythm of their movements in harmony, creating precise actions to gain efficiency, whilst sparing their energy for the final burst of adrenaline. They gradually refine their metabolism to deal with the intensity of their expended effort, sometimes to the point of suffering. They learn to focus under any circumstance, to give their best when the time comes. Each performance is a creation. Sometimes a record can be broke. But in our eternal race against the clock, can we really beat time?
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Aline Gouget Aline Gouget
Technical Advisor on advanced Cryptography
Conference : Does Cyber ​​Security Time accelerate?

Aline Gouget is Technical Advisor on Advanced Cryptography. She is in charge of the security analysis of cryptographic mechanisms and protocols, solving critical issues for different industrial sectors and also designing innovative solutions. Her research topics include quantum-safe cryptography, homomorphic encryption, IoT security and privacy, and blockchain technologies. After studies in pure mathematics at the University of Caen (France), she obtained her Ph.D. on symmetric-key cryptography in 2004. She has published over 30 scientific articles and she is the inventor of more than 30 patents. She has been involved in developing standards, e.g. at ISO/IEC SC27 (Cryptography and security mechanisms). She has 15 years of experience in the application of Cryptography for industrial needs. In 2017, Aline has been awarded the prize Irène Joliot-Curie for “Female Scientist in an Enterprise”.
Conference : Does Cyber ​​Security Time accelerate?
21 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
In progress
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Ana Millet Ana Millet
Violonist
Show : TimeWorldNight

Ana Millet was born in Buenos Aires in 1984 and started playing the violin at the age of 4. In 1997, she was unanimously awarded the gold medal and the City of Limoges Prize. In 2000, she began studying at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris (CNSMD - Paris National Superior Conservatory of Paris for Music and Dance), and she obtained her First Prize in violin four years later. She went on to join the advanced chamber music program for solo violinists. She was first chair of the CNSMD Graduate Orchestra for two seasons and the violinist in Langage Tango. Today, Ana Millet is a member of the Radio France Philharmonic Orchestra.
Show : TimeWorldNight
23 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
What if we took Arnold Schoenberg for his word? ‘The transfigured night’ was inspired by Richard Dehmel’s poem. Wouldn’t it be more spectacular if we only had our ears to receive its beauty? After the poem being read in darkness, the audience would hear Schoenberg’s masterpiece in its sextet string version in the shade. This setting would allow the audience to experience the piece in a new way. A light projection will display dark colours to recreate a night atmosphere. The musicians will exist through their voice and the sound of their instruments. This experiment has never been made before because the six musicians will have to play by heart, with no partition or music stand. ‘The transfigured night’ was created between Germanic Romantism of the XIXth century’s and the modernism Shonenberg and its two disciples Berg and Webern established. Interpreted by Ana Millet, Juliette Salmona, Corentin Bordelot, David Haroutunian, Pauline Bartissol, Sarah Chanaf. Reading by Simon Abkarian.
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Anatole Khelif Anatole Khelif
Mathematician
Workshop : Can Time Emerge in a World Without Time?

Anatole Khélif is a professor and lecturer specialized in mathematical logic. He is a former student of the École Normale Supérieure, rue d’Ulm in Paris. He has been the organizer behind a seminar on categorical logic for several years. For him, logic is about trying, through very schematic means, to describe how our brains work.
Workshop : Can Time Emerge in a World Without Time?
22 novembre 2019 14:00 - Room A1
Is time an illusion ? How can time be induced by timeless elements? How can we solve paradoxes like Zeno (classical and quantum), grand father paradox etc… ? To this end we will introduce the concept of « Metatime ».
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Anne Odru Anne Odru
Reporter

Anne Odru’s natural curiosity and outgoing personality have been strengths in her career. She was initially drawn to science and began a program of study in biology, which led her to discover scientific journalism. Telling and sharing stories became her priority, so she decided to pursue an education in journalism, with a focus on audiovisual media. Today, she works in that field. She loves travelling and discovering the world, and she is passionate about sharing her adventures and stories through writing and pictures with anyone interested.
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Anne-Catherine Hauglustaine Anne-Catherine Hauglustaine
Director of the Museum Air and Space
Conference : .

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Conference : .
23 novembre 2019 09:15 - Amphi Louis Armand
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Antoine Compagnon Antoine Compagnon
Writer and literary critic
Conference : What does Proust mean by Time Regained?

Antoine Compagnon has been professor of "Modern and Contemporary French Literature: history, criticism, and theory" at the Collège de France since 2006. He has also been Professor of French and Comparative Literature at Columbia University in New York since 1985, holding the "Blanche W. Knopf" chair since 1991. Formerly a student at the École Polytechnique (1970), and an engineer from the Ponts et Chaussées engineering school (1975), he was awarded a PhD in arts in 1985. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Academia Europaea, corresponding member of the British Academy, and Doctor honoris causa of King's College, London. He is also a Knight of the Legion of Honor and Commander of the Academic Awards. His most important publications include: Les Antimodernes, de Joseph de Maistre à Roland Barthes (Gallimard, 2005) and Un été avec Montaigne (Equateurs, 2013).
Conference : What does Proust mean by Time Regained?
21 novembre 2019 17:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Siegfried Kracauer, a sharp critic of the notion of zeitgeist – or the unity of a historical period – put forth the remarkable argument that the study of time in In Search of Lost Time is primarily about the “non-simultaneity of contemporaries”. Before Kracauer, Proust saw the present as a compilation of heterogenous moments, autonomous tendencies, and incoherent events located on different paths and following their own logics. The book’s insight is essentially that the world around us is not synchronized. A failure to understand this inevitably leads to social gaffes, as in the case of Madame Verdurin dining with Baron de Charlus. Children believe in the synchronicity and uniform logic of the world. The narrator’s story, about a child who learns that a city is home to different eras, offers a break in time, as in Baudelaire’s The Swan. “I never imagined there could be a building from the eighteenth century on Rue Royale,” the narrator observes. “Likewise, I would have been surprised to learn that Porte Saint-Martin and Porte Saint-Denis, both masterpieces from the time of Louis the Fourteenth, were not from the same era as the most recent buildings in these squalid districts.” Cities, like the world, like life, are not simultaneous. Time Regained is about the discovery that life is anachronous, or that it progresses “against the grain”, to quote Walter Benjamin.
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Audrey Dussutour Audrey Dussutour
Entomologist
Conference : Biological Immortality: fiction or reality?

In 2004, Audrey Dussutour received a PhD in Ethology working with Dr. Vincent Fourcassié and Pr Jean-Louis Deneubourg. At that time, she was studying traffic organization in Ants. Then, she did two post-docs, one at Concordia University (Canada) where she studied collective decision in social caterpillars and one at the University of Sydney (Australia) where she studied nutrition in ants and slime molds. In 2008 she obtained a CNRS position at the CRCA to continue her research on ant behavior. Since 2015, Raphael Jeanson, Jacques Gautrais, Jean-Paul Lachaud and her established a new team at the CRCA, the IVEP team (Interindividual Variability Emergent Plasticity). On the adm side, she is an elected member of the CNRS commission Brain Cognition and Behavior and the Interdisciplinary commission Modeling Biological Systems.
Conference : Biological Immortality: fiction or reality?
23 novembre 2019 10:00 - Amphi Louis Armand
Who has not dreamed one day to find the fountain of youth, to become immortal? The quest for unlimited life has captivated the minds of countless storytellers, alchemists and spiritual leaders. If we are still looking for the Elixir of Immortality and the Philosopher's Stone, some organisms seem to have found the key to immortality. Indeed, the blob, hydra and other strange organisms seem to have found a way to reset their life clock, a secret that remains well kept for now.
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Aurélien Alvarez Aurélien Alvarez
Mathematician
Workshop : The free fall

Aurélien Alvarez is a professor at the University of Orléans. He is particularly interested in geometry, topology, and dynamic systems. He also works to train primary-school teachers as part of his work with the foundation La Main à la Pâte, and he devotes a considerable amount of time to making math accessible. In particular, he is the editor-in-chief of the online periodical Images des Mathématiques.
Workshop : The free fall
23 novembre 2019 10:45 - Room A1
Does a marble fall faster if it is heavier?
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Blanche Stromboni Blanche Stromboni
Bassist
Show : TimeWorldTango

Blanche began studying music at the age of 5 at the Clichy-la-Garenne Conservatory. She continued her education in music at the Conservatoire Supérieur de Paris. In 2010, she received her First Prize by unanimous decision and with honors. Blanche has always been drawn to different styles of music, and Tango Carbón was a natural fit. In 2016, she co-founded the group Tangomotán. Today, she combines her work as a bassist in renowned French orchestras like the Paris Orchestra, the Radio France Philharmonic Orchestra, and the Paris Opera, with her work as a chamber music performer. Ever-eager to learn and expand her musical horizons, she pushes her instrument’s limits.
Show : TimeWorldTango
21 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Tangomotán members seek to improvise and never cease to work on new covers, revisit tunes, evolve and free themselves in order to make tango tangible. Walls will be covered by images while a voice will join instruments and the scene will become a theatre. Time stops during a concert: the past, the present and the future meet and communicate one to another. Everything has changed. It’s all the same.
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Carl Zimmer Carl Zimmer
Author and scientific popularizer
Conference : Are Viruses Masters of Deep Time?

Carl Zimmer is a columnist for the New York Times and the author of thirteen books about science, including A Planet of Viruses and She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity. His writing has earned awards from the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the American Assocation for the Advancement of Science. He is professor adjunct at Yale University.
Conference : Are Viruses Masters of Deep Time?
21 novembre 2019 16:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
For viruses, a fraction of a second can be the difference between survival and doom. But as fleeting as any individual virus may be, viruses also create long-lived lineages that can endure for millions of years and become major forces in our own evolutionary history.
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Catherine Maunoury Catherine Maunoury
CEO Aéro-Club de France
Can we control the volutes of time?

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Can we control the volutes of time?
21 novembre 2019 15:30
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Charlotte Morel Charlotte Morel
Triathlete
Athletics roundtable : Can we beat time?

Charlotte Morel is a professional Triathlete since 2006. Morel took her high-school diploma at the Lycée Saint Exupery (BAC S) and registered with the University of Nice for undergraduate and postgraduate studies in sports. In summer 2008 she obtained the DEUG STAPS and in summer 2009 the Licence L3 in éducation et motricité, a kind of bachelor's degree, to go on with her Master’s studies in nutrition which she concluded in June 2011. She is co-founder of Mytribe Triathlon Coaching.
Athletics roundtable : Can we beat time?
23 novembre 2019 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Athletes are always looking to push their limits, to surpass themselves and beat out the competition. Most of them also try to be as far ahead as possible, even trying to beat the stopwatch. The purpose is to train to the point where they have total control over their body allowing them to excel in their specialty. Like a conductor, the top athlete is a coordinator. The athlete keeps their breathing and the rhythm of their movements in harmony, creating precise actions to gain efficiency, whilst sparing their energy for the final burst of adrenaline. They gradually refine their metabolism to deal with the intensity of their expended effort, sometimes to the point of suffering. They learn to focus under any circumstance, to give their best when the time comes. Each performance is a creation. Sometimes a record can be broke. But in our eternal race against the clock, can we really beat time?
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Christian Wuthrich Christian Wuthrich
Professor of philosophy
Conference : Was there a time before time?

Christian Wuthrich is an associate professor of philosophy in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Geneva. His current research focuses on the philosophical foundations of quantum gravity. Together with Nick Huggett (University of Illinois, Chicago), he is writing a book under contract with Oxford University Press entitled Out of Nowhere: The Emergence of Spacetime in Quantum Theories of Gravity. From September 2015 to August 2018, they run a large project called 'Space and Time After Quantum Gravity' funded by the John Templeton Foundation out of the two centres at Chicago and Geneva. The joint activities for this project are chronicled in the blog Beyond Spacetime. More generally, Christian Wuthrich works mostly in the philosophy of physics, which heavily intrudes into metaphysics and general philosophy of science. Specifically, he works on space and time, time travel, persistence, identity, laws of nature, determinism, and causation.
Conference : Was there a time before time?
22 novembre 2019 17:30 - Amphi Louis Armand
Time, it appears, emerges from the atemporal. Models of quantum cosmology suggest that this emergence relates time and the atemporal both in time and outside of time. How can we conceive of these apparently contradictory relations? Should we think that there was a time before time, or a time beyond time? This is a journey to the limits of existence - and even to the limits of what one might think.
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Cindy Looy Cindy Looy
How did plants alter our planet?
Conference : Professor

Cindy Looy is an associate professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and a curator at the UC Museum of Paleontology and Herbarium. She is interested in the response of Paleozoic plants and plant communities to environmental change during periods of mass extinction and deglaciation, and their potential evolutionary consequences. In particular, her primary research is focused on terrestrial aspects of the end-Permian biotic crisis and its aftermath, and the transition from a glacial-dominated world to an ice-free one during the late Carboniferous to the middle Permian.
Conference : Professor
23 novembre 2019 13:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
From the fossil record we now know that plants moved onto land less than 500 million years ago and gradually established their terrestrial dominance. Not only did they make all other land life possible, but the rise of plants also had a profound impact on the outside of our planet. They changed river systems, increased physical and chemical weathering of rocks, and trapped sediment on land. Using photosynthesis, plants extracted CO2 from the atmosphere while producing organic carbon and releasing O2. Over time more and more carbon ended up stored in the standing biomass and soils, thereby reducing atmospheric CO2 levels. How did these changes affect our planet's climate? And when do we see the first evidence of fire, a to us very common phenomenon that had not existed before plants started to conquer the continents?
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Claude Gronfier Claude Gronfier
Neurobiologist
Conference : Should We Sleep at Night and See Light in the Day?

Claude Gronfier is a neurobiologist specialized in circadian rhythms and sleep patterns. After receiving a doctorate in Neuroscience from the University of Strasbourg, he joined Chuck Czeisler at Harvard Medical School to study the consequences of space travel on circadian rhythms. His research at INSERM focuses on the mechanisms involved in synchronizing the circadian clock, the effects of light at night, and developing light strategies for treating issues linked to shift work, jetlag, mood, and some pathologies. Claude Gronfier is the vice president of the Francophone Society of Chronobiology and serves on the Scientific Board of the Physiology Society.
Conference : Should We Sleep at Night and See Light in the Day?
23 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Louis Armand
From single-cell organisms to human beings, most species observe 24-hour cycles. Sleep, cognitive performance, hormone secretion, body temperature, cell division, and DNA repair are all controlled by a biological circadian clock (relatively closely pegged to a 24-hour cycle). The study of these cycles is called chronobiology. This was the field in which the Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology was awarded in 2017 (to 3 of its pioneers, to be precise). Light is the most powerful force synchronizing the 24-hour biological clock, and having a healthy relationship to light is paramount. In poor-quality light conditions, we observe a deficit in the synchronization of the circadian clock, which generally translates to an alteration in many functions (hormone, core temperature, cardiovascular system, immune system), a decline in neurocognitive functions (cognitive performance, memory), sleep disturbance, and lower concentration. Working at night and delayed sleep, which are phenomena observed in teenage and young-adult populations in particular, are the most common reasons behind desynchronized circadian rhythms. They can have a profound impact on health.
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Corentin Bordelot Corentin Bordelot
Violonist
Show : TimeWorldNight

After five seasons at the Lyon National Orchestra and one season at the Liège Royal Philharmonic Orchestra as a Solo Viola, Corentin has been 3rd Solo Viola at the French National Orchestra since January 2015. In 2005, he received his First Prize in Viola on the unanimous decision of the Conservatoire à Rayonnement Régional in Boulogne-Billancourt. That same year, he enrolled in the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse de Paris. Corentin has always been passionate about a career in an orchestra, and in 2006 he joined the French Youth Orchestra. A musician and chamber music performer, he has collaborated with Menahem Pressler, Zaïde Quartet, Voce Quartet, Dissonances, Balcon, the Auvergne Orchestra, and the Philharmonic Orchestra, among others.
Show : TimeWorldNight
23 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
What if we took Arnold Schoenberg for his word? ‘The transfigured night’ was inspired by Richard Dehmel’s poem. Wouldn’t it be more spectacular if we only had our ears to receive its beauty? After the poem being read in darkness, the audience would hear Schoenberg’s masterpiece in its sextet string version in the shade. This setting would allow the audience to experience the piece in a new way. A light projection will display dark colours to recreate a night atmosphere. The musicians will exist through their voice and the sound of their instruments. This experiment has never been made before because the six musicians will have to play by heart, with no partition or music stand. ‘The transfigured night’ was created between Germanic Romantism of the XIXth century’s and the modernism Shonenberg and its two disciples Berg and Webern established. Interpreted by Ana Millet, Juliette Salmona, Corentin Bordelot, David Haroutunian, Pauline Bartissol, Sarah Chanaf. Reading by Simon Abkarian.
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Cyprien Verseux Cyprien Verseux
Astrobiologist
Conference : Does Time exist without event?

Cyprien Verseux is an astrobiologist working on the search for life beyond Earth and an expert in biological life support systems for Mars exploration. Part of his research aims at making human outposts on Mars as independent as possible of Earth, by using living organisms to process Mars’s resources into products needed for human consumption. In other words, he is figuring out how to live on Mars off the land using biology and what is already there. He currently is a PhD student co-directed by Daniela Billi, at the University of Rome II and Lynn Rothschild, at NASA Ames Research Center. Prior to focusing on astrobiology he obtained Master’s degrees in Systems and Synthetic Biology from the Institute of Systems and Synthetic Biology and in Biotechnology Engineering from Sup’Biotech Paris. On Earth and outside the lab he enjoys skydiving, road trips with a tent and a few friends, swimming in lakes and seas, mountaineering, writing, reading a wide range of books and living stimulating new experiences.
Conference : Does Time exist without event?
23 novembre 2019 12:15 - Amphi Louis Armand
In progress
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Cyril Rigaud Cyril Rigaud
Scientific advisor

Cyril Rigaud was born in Provence and spent his childhood and adolescence gazing at the sky. He studied science and earned a pilot certificate at age 17. In June 1995, he joined the French Air Force as a transport pilot. Initially in charge of support and training missions for forces in mainland France, overseas, and abroad, he became an instructor in 2006-2008. He then went on to join the transportation team for high-level government officials and health evacuations, until 2013. As of 2010, he has also ensured travel for top government officials. In early 2016, he became a co-pilot on a Canadair CL 415 water bombardier for emergency services.
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Daniel Kunth Daniel Kunth
Astronomer
Conference : Can we live without a calendar?

Daniel Kunth has a PhD in astrophysics. He developed and achieved at CALTECH. He accessed to large telescopes such as the 5m at Mount Palomar, the VLT and the 10m Keck at Hawaii. Currently at the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris (IAP) continuing proposing projects and obtaining data from the Hubble space telescope when in 1990, he became PI of an observing extragalactic and cosmological program. He is still acting as the leader of an international team focussed on this project. He has more than 200 publications on refereed journals. He created the annual Scientific Conference series of the IAP and regular monthly public conferences more than 20 years ago. In 1991, following the suggestion of Hubert Curien minister of research, Daniel Kunth produced a report on the dedication of research scientists to public outreach activities. He conceived various outreach activities via several popular books, conferences, design of the permanent astronomical Museum of Vaulx en Velin. He conceived a 3D movie named Helios for the Cité des sciences et de l'industrie in Paris. Most importantly, he initiated the Nuit des Etoiles with France 2 and many Astronomical associations and clubs. He is also promoting strong links between art and science (with artists such as B. Moninot, J. Monory, P. Soulages).
Conference : Can we live without a calendar?
23 novembre 2019 10:45 - Amphi Louis Armand
In 1582, a calendar change had a massive impact on people’s everyday lives. Jules Caesar’s calendar, which had been observed for fifteen centuries, was now deemed unsuitable. There was a 10-day lag from the expected start of spring, and things seemed likely only to worsen. So, in 1582, Pope Gregory XII decided to remove 10 days from the month of October! And what about today? In our era of satellite-controlled GPS, our watches neglect the fact that the Earth does not spin in a perfect circle, and our calendar seems to be set in stone. Without a glitch, our calendar determines the scheduling of our activities, codifies our past, and presages our future. Nevertheless, the rollover to the year 2000 created fears that our computers would fail as we capped off the millennium. We have forgotten how to tell the time based on the sun, and we now live according to a new form of dependence. Some long for a slower pace of life and less precision. Are we in synch with our calendar? Could we live without it?
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David Haroutunian David Haroutunian
Violonist

David Haroutunian was born in Erevan, Armenia, and began playing the violin at age six under Petros Haykazyan. In 1995, he enrolled in the CNSM in Paris, receiving his First Prize in violin in 1998. He has worked as a soloist for different orchestras, on recitals, and in chamber music ensembles. He has collaborated with Paul Badura-Skoda, François-Frédéric Guy, Itamar Golan, Sonia Wieder-Atherton, Vahan Mardirossian, Henri Demarquette, Laurent Wagschal, Jean-Jacques Kantorow, and Gérard Poulet. Very drawn to Argentina and Argentinian music, he joined Tango Carbón in 2014. Speaking about David Haroutunian, Ivry Gitlis has said: “The talent and abilities in violin and music of this young musician go hand in hand with his complete commitment to his interpretations”.
Tangomotán members seek to improvise and never cease to work on new covers, revisit tunes, evolve and free themselves in order to make tango tangible. Walls will be covered by images while a voice will join instruments and the scene will become a theatre. Time stops during a concert: the past, the present and the future meet and communicate one to another. Everything has changed. It’s all the same.
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Emma Humphris Emma Humphris
Student
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?

Emma Humphris is a PhD student in Theater and Performance studies at Stanford University. She holds a Master of Science in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Oxford University, and a degree in Philosophy and Political Science from Sciences Po-Paris and La Sorbonne. Her work focuses on the role of new technologies, and in particular virtual reality, in addressing gender inequalities in the Police and the private sector. She uses the lens of “performance studies” to examine both gender inequalities in organizations and virtual reality’s potential. Emma Humphris is also committed to reduce gender inequalities in sports through her organization Equal Playing Field.
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?
23 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Our daily life seems to be articulated around omnipresent accelerations. Automated transports, automatic correctors, search engines, notifications... We are used to knowing the result of a crucial election in real time, we can even automatically replay the crucial goal of a thrilling match online within seconds. Access to information is so rapid that the distance from events to the present seems to be fading away and the length of time that separates us from events in the near future seems to be shrinking. The digital even proposes to accelerate our private lives by organizing romantic meetings in one click! But does speeding up really save time? This is the question that six students will discuss at this roundtable. Their goal will be to highlight the relationship millennials maintain within our current society and impact of the quickening pace it imposes on us.
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Eric Nataf Eric Nataf
Radiologist
Conference : Is muscle the future of man?

Eric Nataf works in a private office in Paris as a radiologist, specialized in fertility and osteoarticular imaging. Whilst caring for sportsmen he became more and more interested in how human muscles evolve throughout a lifetime. He regularly writes columns in several magazines and participated in creating both “Mémo Larousse” and the medical Larousse encyclopedia. His first book titled “Autobiography of a virus” (2004) was awarded the Grand Prix of Artois University. In 2018 he published “The hidden son of the moon”. Eric is also passionate about photography and keeps seeking everyday life’s details and traces of our civilization.
Conference : Is muscle the future of man?
23 novembre 2019 16:15 - Amphi Louis Armand
The muscle is an hybrid tissue. Essential element of our locomotor system, it is also permanently connected to our nervous system, for which it is the « armed arm ». Our muscles allow us to stand against gravity, to run and jump. They are also linked with the skeleton, which can be considered, in terms of evolution, as an old ossified muscular tissue. The muscles, which constitute our main protein reserve, reflect the good health of our DNA for which they are the reversed mirror. However, with time, our muscular system also grows old : at 70 years old, we have already lost 50% of our « muscle capital ». This loss of muscular mass, if it reaches a certain threshold, is called « sarcopenia ». Falls, addictions, costs for the societies etc., the consequences of sarcopenia are multiples. Moreover, the muscles are directly linked with motor neurons of the central nervous system. Sarcopenia goes with their degeneration, and therefore with the fall of cognitive functions. Training his/her muscles is therefore toning up his/her brain ! The training of the musculo-skeletal system is also a great challenge for humans who will live in space. We all think about videos showing astronauts running during hours on treadmills to maintain their muscular mass and to avoid their skeleton collapes once back on Earth. This has been never tried before, but it is probable that a human who grows up in space, where gravity differs, would be very different : a rubbery body, a large head with unsutured fontanelles, and muscles reduced to drafts… If muscles have to be considered with extreme caution on the Moon or on board the International Space Station, on Earth they could represent the future of man.
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Estelle Honnorat Estelle Honnorat
Investigative Journalist

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Etienne Klein Etienne Klein
Physicist and philosopher
Conference : What does the polysemy of time reveal to us?

Étienne Klein is a French physicist and philosopher of science. A graduate of École Centrale Paris, he holds a DEA (Master of Advanced Studies) in theoretical physics, as well as a Ph.D. in philosophy of science and an accreditation to supervise research (HDR). He is currently head of the Laboratoire des Recherches sur les Sciences de la Matière (LARSIM), a research laboratory belonging to the CEA and located in Saclay near Paris. He taught quantum physics and particle physics at Centrale Paris for several years and currently teaches philosophy of science. He is a specialist in the question of time in physics and has written a number of essays on the subject. He presents a radio chronicle La Conversation scientifique every Saturday, on the French public station France Culture. Étienne Klein is the author of many books. He practises mountain-climbing and other endurance sports.
Conference : What does the polysemy of time reveal to us?
21 novembre 2019 10:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
We reflect on time but we never really know what it is we are thinking about: is it a substance? a fluid? an illusion? or a social construct? There are many common sayings that suggest it's a physical being, while others imply the opposite, for example that it's just a figment of our imagination, or an aspect of natural processes. So, fundamentally, what is time really like? Is it how our language suggests? How we think we perceive or experience it? How it is represented by physicists? How it is thought of by philosophers?
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Eymard Houdeville Eymard Houdeville
Student
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?

Eymard Houdeville is a machine learning engineer and a philosopher. His research work, at IDEMIA currently concerns neural networks architectures for computer vision applications. Eymard is especially interested in philosophy of sciences and epistemology of data sciences: what's the role of simplicity in experiments where we manipulate gigabits of data? Eymard wrote his master thesis at Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris in 2018 about the irreproducibility crisis in modern sciences: how can we explain the fact that sciences is full of spurious and fallacious correlations? Worried about social consequences of these new ways to act and think, Eymard has started several vulgarization works and notably realized a tour of european hackerspaces in 2016. Eymard also holds a degree in politicial science of Sciences Po Paris and a bachelor in applied mathematics of Sorbonne University.
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?
23 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Our daily life seems to be articulated around omnipresent accelerations. Automated transports, automatic correctors, search engines, notifications... We are used to knowing the result of a crucial election in real time, we can even automatically replay the crucial goal of a thrilling match online within seconds. Access to information is so rapid that the distance from events to the present seems to be fading away and the length of time that separates us from events in the near future seems to be shrinking. The digital even proposes to accelerate our private lives by organizing romantic meetings in one click! But does speeding up really save time? This is the question that six students will discuss at this roundtable. Their goal will be to highlight the relationship millennials maintain within our current society and impact of the quickening pace it imposes on us.
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Frances Westall Frances Westall
Geochemist
Conference : What's the origin of life?

Frances Westall was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. She grew up in the United Kingdom, and studied geology at the Universities of Edinburgh in Scotland and Cape Town in South Africa. She refers to herself as a scientific "vagabond", having worked in many countries including a postdoc in marine geology at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Bremerhaven, followed by research in geobiology at the Universities of Nantes and Bologna. She was a senior researcher at the NASA (JPL) and the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston in the period after the announcement of possible traces of life in the martian meteorite ALH84001 by David McKay and his group before becoming the leader of the Exobiology Group of the CNRS in Orléans in 2002, a position she took over from André Brack, a noted prebiotic chemist. She was head of the French Exobiology society from 2006-2008. Specialising in the oldest traces of life on Earth, she is very involved in the 2018 international mission to Mars from the instrumental side and from the science side as well.
Conference : What's the origin of life?
21 novembre 2019 10:00 - Amphi Louis Armand
How did life appear – on Earth or elsewhere? Did life arrive on Earth from somewhere else by Panspermia? Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? Even if terrestrial life is originally an extraterrestrial phenomenon, an hypothesis that scientists working in this field do not believe, it appeared somewhere and somehow. But how? Most origin of life hypotheses consider that prebiotic processes led naturally to biology. In this case, and many laboratories are furiously trying to reproduce simple proto-cells, it is possible that life (based on water and carbonaceous molecules) is widely distributed in the Univers, at least on rocky planets, which are probably quite common. But what kind of life? Intelligent and technologically capable life like Homo sapiens sapiens or simple life like bacteria? The origin of life, its distribution in the Univers and its destiny are some of the most important questions for mankind and answering them is one of the greatest challenges facing science.
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Frank Lehot Frank Lehot
Aviation doctor
Conference : Does weightlessness accelerate the effects of time?

In progress
Conference : Does weightlessness accelerate the effects of time?
23 novembre 2019 13:00 - Amphi Louis Armand
In progress
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Frédéric Paillart Frédéric Paillart
Security Architect
Conference : Does Cyber ​​Security Time accelerate?

Frédéric Paillart is a Software Security Architect in Gemalto, now Thales Digital Identity and Security, since 10 years. He is in charge of supporting the development teams for building secure and for security solutions mostly for Mobile Network Operator market. He has started his career as developper and next architect before to move as security expert, and he is considering himself as a technology enthusiast. In parallel to his career in Thales, Frédéric is teaching ethical hacking in French Engineering schools, sharing his experiences and knowledges both to students and professionals following master degree. Since one year Frédéric is building and managing a two years focus cybersecurity training for the ISEN Yncrea Méditerranée Engineering school.
Conference : Does Cyber ​​Security Time accelerate?
21 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
In progress
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Gautier Depambour Gautier Depambour
Student
Conference : Going faster: will it allow us to gain time?

Former student of the French engineering school CentraleSupélec, Gautier Depambour is currently studying History and Philosophy of Science at Paris VII University. During his gap year, he had the opportunity to work as an intern for five months at CERN within the communication group of the ATLAS detector. Meanwhile, he has lead a Machine Learning project on particle physics. He has also spent six months in the Quantum Cavity Electrodynamics group in the Kastler-Brossel Laboratory (Collège de France, Paris) for his Masters degree in nanophysics. Finally, he feels passionate about explaining and helping others understand science. He is involved in several projects such as the website of the French physicist and philosopher Etienne Klein. He also wrote a book to tell his experience at CERN, called Une Journée au CERN.
Conference : Going faster: will it allow us to gain time?
23 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Our daily life seems to be articulated around omnipresent accelerations. Automated transports, automatic correctors, search engines, notifications... We are used to knowing the result of a crucial election in real time, we can even automatically replay the crucial goal of a thrilling match online within seconds. Access to information is so rapid that the distance from events to the present seems to be fading away and the length of time that separates us from events in the near future seems to be shrinking. The digital even proposes to accelerate our private lives by organizing romantic meetings in one click! But does speeding up really save time? This is the question that six students will discuss at this roundtable. Their goal will be to highlight the relationship millennials maintain within our current society and impact of the quickening pace it imposes on us.
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Gennady Padalka Gennady Padalka
Astronaut
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?

Gennady Padalka was selected as a cosmonaut candidate to start training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in 1989. From June 1989 to January 1991 he attended basic space training. Padalka currently has the world record for the most time spent in space, having spent 879 days in space. Gennady Padalka is a recipient of the Hero Star of the Russian Federation and the title of Russian Federation Test-Cosmonaut. He is decorated with Fatherland Service Medal fourth class, Medals of the Russian Federation and also Medal of the International Fund of Cosmonautics support for Service to Cosmonautics.
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?
21 novembre 2019 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
The countdown starts early. At the beginning of the selection to become an astronaut, or even as soon as the idea of ​​making the trip out of the atmosphere crosses the mind of the candidate. Everything is then linked, step by step, success after success, until the ultimate consecration when the contender is part of the team, the one that brings together extraordinary human beings, ready to follow the training mission for an adventure into space. Many months of intensive preparation, with a meticulously planned program, still separate the future hero from the last seconds of the countdown. The astronaut has to keep making progress every day. A few hours before they take off, the crew are placed into quarantine. On the launching ramp, curled up in their seats, they will be propelled into space within the deadline imposed by the launching procedure. In less than nine minutes, they will travel at an orbital speed of 28,000 km / h and will pass around the Earth 16 times each day. The real mission has just begun. Whether it is to ensure proper operation of the instruments, to repair them, to carry out scientific experiments, to communicate with Earth, to interact with their teammates, to sleep, to eat, the astronauts evolve at a certain pace, a pace which is imposed upon them by the trials of space. Although they are very busy, the return to Earth, close to where their loved ones reside can sometimes seem so far away. At each stage, even during an extravehicular exit or the return trip to Earth: is it possible for astronauts to challenge time?
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Georges Lewi Georges Lewi
Brand Expert
Conference : Can brands can rejuvenate?

Combining education in both classical letters and marketing, Georges Lewi has developed an interest in brands’ life very early and started his research on brands’ life cycle with his first book "Sale temps pour les marques » (Bad weather for brands). He analyzed a paradoxical phenomenon: some young brands are aging prematurely while centuries old brands are doing very well. Author of over 15 books, he is considered as one of the best European branding specialists. He taught at HEC Paris, at CELSA (Paris4Sorbonne), delivering his knowledge in conferences and in consulting for major companies where he handled about 500 case studies. He received many honors thanks to his work on storytelling.
Conference : Can brands can rejuvenate?
22 novembre 2019 15:30 - Amphi Louis Armand
Marketing familiarized companies and consumers to further understand the product’s lifecycle. A company launches a product, exploits it as long as possible then, before it announces obsolescence (when it does not provoke it), drops it and launches a new one. However, brands are made to last; As if they escaped human time. The brands’ life cycle unfolds inexorably in three sequences and a makeover. First, time of heroism, when young brands grow, some of which will aged prematurely. Then time of wisdom, when each brand will have to understand where it stands in its market. Finally comes time of myth in which the brand, having found its place in a market, will have to prove its legitimacy in the society. Then will come - or not -, time of rejuvenation when the brand will have to seduce new generations. To achieve it, it can neither deny itself nor freeze. The brand’s myth as any myths will have to reinvent itself while retaining its original power. This strange phenomenon probably teaches us as much about the human condition as about marketing rules ...
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Gilles Dawidowicz Gilles Dawidowicz
Geographer

Gilles Dawidowicz is a geographer (Sorbonne University), specialized in planetary sciences. He has been campaigning since the 90s for a robotic exploration of the solar system bodies and is promoting the exploration of Mars. Former member of the Mars Society and its French chapter the Association Planète Mars, he has been president of the Triel Observatory for 5 years and has for many years chaired the Planetary Committee of the Société astronomique de France, of which he is the Secretary General since June 2018. Gilles is also co-author of popular works on Mars, Saturn and Northern lights. He regularly hosts major public meetings at the Cité des Sciences et de l'Industrie (Paris) covering international space news.
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Hartmut Rosa Hartmut Rosa
Professor of Sociology
Conference : Resonance and Alienation. Two Modes of Experiencing Time ?

Hartmut Rosa is Professor of Sociology and Social Theory at Friedrich-Schiller-University in Jena, Germany and Director of the Max-Weber-Kolleg at the University of Erfurt. He also is an Affiliated Professor at the Department of Sociology, New School for Social Research, New York. In 1997, he received his PhD in Political Science from Humboldt-University in Berlin. After that, he held teaching positions at the universities of Mannheim, Jena, Augsburg and Essen and served as Vice-President and General Secretary for Research Committee 35 (COCTA) of ISA and as one of the directors of the Annual International Conference on Philosophy and the Social Sciences in Prague. In 2016, he was a visiting professor at the FMSH/EHESS in Paris. He is editor of the international journal Time and Society. His publications focus on Social Acceleration, Resonance and the Temporal Structures of Modernity as well as the Political Theory of Communitarianism.
Conference : Resonance and Alienation. Two Modes of Experiencing Time ?
22 novembre 2019 16:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Modern societies are characterized by the fact that they can only operate in a mode of dynamic stabilization, i.e. they are permanently forced to grow, to speed-up and to innovate in order to reproduce their structure and to maintain their institutional status quo. This mode of stabilization is connected to a particular form of using and experiencing time: Time becomes the scarcest commodity of all. However, this form of conceptualizing and using time produces the danger of a profound form of alienation: Social actors lack the capability to truly ‘appropriate’ time and to meaningfully connect their lives to the past and to the future. In short, in the age of acceleration, it becomes increasingly difficult to connect the time of our everyday-lives to our biographical life-time and to the time of the historical epoch we live in. By contrast, if we operate in a mode of resonance, which is a central modern aspiration, too, the experience of time changes fundamentally in its character: Resonance is a mode of relating to the world of things, of people, of the self and of life as a totality in which a transformative appropriation of time is possible. Its signature feature is a vibrant ‘connection’ between past, present and future, an opening of the temporal horizon and an immersion in time that stands in sharp contrast to the commodifying stance. Hence, are alienation and resonance two alternative modes of being in time, and of experiencing time?
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Hervé Cottin Hervé Cottin
Astrochemist
Conference : Is it comets o’clock ?

Hervé Cottin is a full professor at University Paris Est Créteil where he teaches chemistry and astronomy. He conducts research at the Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques (LISA). Hervé Cottin is president of the French Society of Exobiology, member of the Solar System working group of CNES and head of the UPEC Space Campus. His research is mainly devoted to the study of the origin and evolution of cometary organic matter. He seeks to understand to what extent comets could have contributed to the emergence of life on Earth and what their composition can tell us about the birth of the Solar System. His work is based on laboratory experiments and in situ measurements with the Rosetta space mission. They are complemented by studies in Earth orbit outside the International Space Station. Recently, Hervé Cottin has contributed to the detection of glycine (the simplest amino acid) and organic macromolecules in the comet 67P / Churyomov-Gerasimenko. He is also part of the scientific team of the MOMA instrument which objective will be the search for organic matter at the surface of Mars thanks to the Rosalind Franklin rover of the European mission Exomars.
Conference : Is it comets o’clock ?
22 novembre 2019 14:00 - Amphi Louis Armand
Primitive matter in a freezer, where time would have frozen, is that the stuff comets are made of? These objects count among the most mysterious bodies of the solar system. Because of their small size, comets probably have not been transformed under the action of their own gravity. In addition, held in the outskirts of the solar system, in the coldest and most remote regions, they have been particularly preserved from solar radiation. It is generally accepted that comets could contain material that has not evolved since their formation, and that would therefore reflect the conditions that prevailed at the time of formation of our system. Comets are often called "the archives of the sky". What are they learning us?
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Hervé Fischer Hervé Fischer
Artist and sociologist
Conference : Posthumanism or Hyperhumanism?

Multimedia artist and philosopher Hervé Fischer initiated Sociological art in1971 and practices since 2011 tweet art and tweet philosophy. His work has been presented in numerous art museums and biennales. The Centre Pompidou has devoted to him a retrospective Hervé Fischer and sociological art in 2017. Pioneer of the digital revolution in Quebec, he cofounded the Cité des arts et des nouvelles technologies de Montréal in 1985, the first Cybercafé in Canada, the Télescience Festival, Science for All. His research focuses on art, sociology of colors, the digital revolution , social imagination, hyperhumanism. He created the Quebec Media lab Hexagram. He is the author many books including Théorie de l’art sociologique (1977), L’Histoire de l’art est terminée (1981), Digital Shock (2002), CyberProméthée, l’instinct de puissance (2003), La planète hyper, de la pensée linéaire à la pensée en arabesque (2004), The Decline of the Hollywood Empire (2005), La société sur le divan (2007), L’Avenir de l’art (2010), La divergence du futur (2014), La pensée imaginaire du Net (2014), Market Art (2016). He is the founder of the International Society of Mythanalysis.
Conference : Posthumanism or Hyperhumanism?
22 novembre 2019 13:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Mythanalysis states that every reality is fabulation, every fabulation is reality, but we have to choose carefully our fabulations and avoid hallucinations. Time in the past stuck to existence as reality sticks to our eyes, creating our ordinary feeling of life. Nowadays time’s exponential acceleration cuts itself from daily life. It erases it as it would do with digital files, and launches us into an imaginary future, which seems by now to be at the very core of our human adventure. Those attached to the past expect with fatalism the apocalypse, whereas the fundamentalist prophets of the digital technology, who denounce the obsolescence of the carbon human being, predict our mutation into trans- and posthumanism thanks to silicon. These cyberPromothean promises of power replace the collapsed political utopia of the 19th century. Denying our vital instinct and the very fragility of nature, which is also ours, these utopias will not do better. We propose an alternative techno-humanism that we call hyperhumanism. Hyper for more humanism thanks to the multiplication of the digital hyperlinks, which create in real time an « augmented consciousness », and therefore the global ethics we need. The human progress, which may result of it, may be more uncertain than technological progress, but it will be more critical for our future.
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Hidehiro Tachibana Hidehiro Tachibana
Professor
Conference : In what kind of time do the Japanese people live?

Hidehiro Tachibana works mainly on Francophone literature, in particular, from the Caribbean and Quebec. He is interested in Francophone and Asian intellectuals who feel torn between their native culture and their knowledge of the West. Author or co-author notably of Quebec so distant, so close (2013), Intellectuals in the 21st Century (2009), he has also translated into Japanese several francophone authors: Pierre Bourdieu, Dany Laferrière, Aimé Césaire, Edouard Glissant, Julio Cortazar and many Quebec poets. He is professor at Waseda University in Tokyo and President of the Japanese Association of Quebec studies.
Conference : In what kind of time do the Japanese people live?
21 novembre 2019 11:30 - Amphi Louis Armand
When we say in French " the time", it may be the weather or the time itself. The Japanese people combine these two times metaphorically or metonymically, so that the perception of time is very often linked to the weather. Our traditional poetry testifies also of this Japanese particular sensibility to the passing time. This perception of a cyclic time divided in seasons goes back to this mythical world of Shintoism, described in the Kojiki. (a Tale of the Ancient Time).The Japanese have also adopted another perception of time, that of the duration or precariousness, introduced by Buddhism. It is a very different philosophy of the Western Hegelian philosophy of History. This Buddhist philosophy evocates in literary works an epic time, which shows to us that everything on Earth is ephemeral. It is therefore a difficult question to understand why and how the Japanese people managed to build a so-called "modern" society whereas these traditional perceptions of time do not seem compatible with our modern times. And even more we wonder how our youth may cheer the digital time. These questions lead us to the importance of the Shinto time, which keeps latent in contemporary life in Japan.
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Hubert Reeves Hubert Reeves
Astrophysicist
Conference : Is it possible to determine the age of time?

Hubert Reeves is a French Canadian astrophysicist and popularizer of science. He obtained a BSc degree in physics from the Université de Montréal in 1953, an MSc degree from McGill University in 1956 with a thesis entitled "Formation of Positronium in Hydrogen and Helium" and a PhD degree at Cornell University in 1960. From 1960 to 1964, he taught physics at the Université de Montréal and worked as an advisor to NASA. He has been a Director of Research at the Centre national de la recherche scientifique since 1965. In 1994, he was made Officer of the National Order of Quebec. He was promoted to Grand Officer in 2017. His most important publications include: Patience dans l'azur (1981) and Poussières d’étoiles (1984), Là où croît le péril… croît aussi ce qui sauve (2013), Le Banc du temps qui passe (2017).
Conference : Is it possible to determine the age of time?
23 novembre 2019 16:15 - Amphi Gaston Berger
In most ancient traditions, there is an idea that the universe has not always existed. For them, there was a moment of creation which initiated the history of the world. For instance, in Genesis, God created the heavens and Earth, while in native cultures in Western Canada, the mythical crow takes on the role of the creator. Time becomes an interesting subject of inquiry if we combine this worldview with modern science. Our first question is the following: Is there evidence of a period when the universe did not exist and for which the act of creation represented its end? In other words: Has time always existed? Or rather: For how long has time existed?
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Hélène Crochemore Hélène Crochemore
Art Director

After two years of architecture school in Rouen and several hundred hours in the Denis Godefroy studio, Hélène spent four years at the School of Decorative Arts in Paris. With a hand in many domains, she primarily works in publishing (novels, essays, academic texts), and goes between abstract painting to collage, travel journals to Street Art, and photomontage to digital images. She is a fan of diversification and choice. Hélène enjoys hunting for new ideas and putting emerging ones on paper, using a wide array of techniques.
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Jacques Arnould Jacques Arnould
Ehics expert
Conference : Are we losing our time?

Jacques Arnould is an engineer in agronomy and forestry, with a Ph.D. in History of Sciences as well as a Ph.D. in Theology. He researches the interrelation between sciences, cultures, and religions, with a particular interest in two areas: life sciences and space exploration. With respect to the first area, he has written several books on the historical and theological dimensions of the life sciences, with a special emphasis on evolution. With respect to the conquest of space, since 2001 he has served as ethics advisor to the Centre national d'études spatiales (CNES), the French space agency. Dr. Arnould has served as adjunct faculty with the International Space University since 2000, and he is an elected member of the International Academy of Astronautics. In 2004 he was awarded the Labruyère Prize from the Académie Française, and in 2011 the received the Audiffred Prize from the Académie des sciences morales et politiques. In addition to authoring numerous books in French, he has published Gene Avatars: The Neo-Darwinian Theory of Evolution (2002), God vs Darwin: Will the Creationists Triumph over Science? (2009), Icarus’ Second Chance: The Basis and Perspectives of Space Ethics (2011) and God, the Moon, and the Astronaut (2015).
Conference : Are we losing our time?
21 novembre 2019 14:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Reality such as we discover and build it using our knowledge and tools offers new and vertiginous horizons for our ambitions, dreams, and hopes. From cosmology to transhumanism and new technologies, time, space, life, and matter seem to offer our human species new and sometimes outrageous conditions. Are these the conditions of and solutions for our salvation and survival? Or do they presage our extinction? Should we anticipate, endure, and even provoke the “end of days”? Or should we seize these times as an “opportunity”?
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Jean Viard Jean Viard
Sociologist and writer
Conference : Is it possible to build a sociological analysis of time?

A sociologist, Jean Viard is an associate research director at CNRS (Centre national de la recherche scientifique) attached to the CEVIPOF (Centre de recherches politiques de l’Institut de sciences politiques). He holds a master in economy (University of Aix-en-Provence) and a PhD in sociology (École des hautes études en sciences sociales). His expertise is in sociology of time (holidays, 35 working hours per week), space management (land planning, agricultural issues) and politics. Guest speaker, regular press writer, he also works as an adviser for private corporations and territorial agencies. He was columnist at Le Journal du Dimanche, the Polka magazine. He took part in the conception of the “Nouvel Obs-le plus” platform on line. He regularly participates in the Arte 28’ TV program and News. He has published several books, including “Quand la Méditerranée nous submerge” (2017) “Chronique française. De Mitterrand à Macron” (2018), “Une société si vivante” (2019) (Aube publisher).
Conference : Is it possible to build a sociological analysis of time?
21 novembre 2019 12:15 - Amphi Louis Armand
We are immerged in a society of hyper time-consuming: the social supply of things to be done increases faster than the time available for them, which itself accelerates constantly. We may turn on 36 TV programs, read tons of books, take flights to travel everywhere, the internet stress keeps continuously pressuring… But we should keep aware that we never had so much free time available by far. Considering the available time globally, l note that our average life expectancy reaches nowadays 700 000 hours instead of 500 000 hours before 1914 and an estimate of 300 000 hours at the time of Jesus Christ. We gained 10 years since 1945, 20 years since the beginning of the 20th century. From our 700 000 hours some 200 000 hours are dedicated to sleep, 30 000 hours to studies. Taking in account our hours dedicated to sleep, studies and work, we still enjoy 400 000 hours fro free time. Our society belongs therefore to a long-time base civilization and short working time. The digital society connects autonomous individuals, and catch them in its nets, bombarding them with messages coloured with a sense of urgency. We feel obliged to answer immediately. Having come so far, don’t we should know how to take back control of the situation?
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Jean-Christophe Baillie Jean-Christophe Baillie
CEO Novaquark
Conference : Do virtual worlds change the nature of time?

Jean–Christophe Baillie is a French scientist and entrepreneur. He founded the ENSTA ParisTech Robotics Lab where he worked on developmental robotics and computational evolutionary linguistics. While at ENSTA, he designed the urbiscript programming language to control robots, which became the base technology of Gostai, a robotics startup he created in 2006, which has been acquired by Aldebaran Robotics in 2012. More recently, he founded Novaquark, a video game development studio, developing emergent systemic gameplay and being at the forefront of massively mutiplayer online game concepts. Novaquark is currently gearing up to release Dual Universe, the first single-shard Sci-Fi first person sandox MMORPG game with editable content and emergent gameplay. Jean–Christophe Baillie holds a degree from the École Polytechnique in Paris where he studied computer science and theoretical physics. He did his PhD in Artificial Intelligence and Robotics at Université Pierre & Marie Curie in co-supervision with Luc Steels at the Sony Computer Science Lab in Paris.
Conference : Do virtual worlds change the nature of time?
22 novembre 2018 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Virtual worlds have the ability to immerse us into alternate realities and alternate spatiotemporal modalities. We will discuss the philosophical implications of this immersion with several examples. In particular we will illustrate it with Dual Universe, an ambitious “metaverse” taking place in a vast virtual world made of several planets, and where participants are free to rebuild entire civilizations.
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Jean-Claude Carrière Jean-Claude Carrière
Novelist and Screenwriter
Conference : Does Cinema Have Time?

Jean-Claude Carrière is a French novelist, screenwriter, actor, and Academy Award honoree. He was an alumnus of the École normale supérieure de Saint-Cloud and was president of La Fémis, the French state film school. Carrière was a frequent collaborator with Luis Buñuel on the screenplays of Buñuel's late French films.
Conference : Does Cinema Have Time?
23 novembre 2019 12:15 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Since its inception, cinema has played with time. In cinema, time unfolds in a way proper to the art. It uses technical ruses to manipulate time. The succession of images is sped up, slowed down, and even frozen, offering viewers exciting effects. Many examples illustrate the power of this art, which at once reflects and betrays time!
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Jean-François Clervoy Jean-François Clervoy
Astronaut
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?

Jean-François Clervoy, successively active French, NASA and European astronaut for 33 years ranks as brigadier general from DGA (Defense procurement agency) reserve. Born in 1958, JFC graduated from Ecole Polytechnique in 1981, from SupAero college of Aeronautics in 1983 and from Test flying school in 1987. He flew on three missions aboard the space shuttle: in 1994 to study the atmosphere, in 1997 to resupply the Russian space station Mir, and in 1999 to repair the Hubble space telescope. Then JFC worked as senior advisor for the ESA human space flight programs and is chairman of Novespace which organizes weightlessness parabolic flights aboard the Airbus A310 ZERO-G. He is author, inventor and professional speaker. He is member of several organizations for the promotion of space exploration and for the protection of planet Earth.
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?
21 novembre 2019 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
The countdown starts early. At the beginning of the selection to become an astronaut, or even as soon as the idea of ​​making the trip out of the atmosphere crosses the mind of the candidate. Everything is then linked, step by step, success after success, until the ultimate consecration when the contender is part of the team, the one that brings together extraordinary human beings, ready to follow the training mission for an adventure into space. Many months of intensive preparation, with a meticulously planned program, still separate the future hero from the last seconds of the countdown. The astronaut has to keep making progress every day. A few hours before they take off, the crew are placed into quarantine. On the launching ramp, curled up in their seats, they will be propelled into space within the deadline imposed by the launching procedure. In less than nine minutes, they will travel at an orbital speed of 28,000 km / h and will pass around the Earth 16 times each day. The real mission has just begun. Whether it is to ensure proper operation of the instruments, to repair them, to carry out scientific experiments, to communicate with Earth, to interact with their teammates, to sleep, to eat, the astronauts evolve at a certain pace, a pace which is imposed upon them by the trials of space. Although they are very busy, the return to Earth, close to where their loved ones reside can sometimes seem so far away. At each stage, even during an extravehicular exit or the return trip to Earth: is it possible for astronauts to challenge time?
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Jean-Louis Giavitto Jean-Louis Giavitto
Researcher in Computer Science
Conference : Can we tune the time of men and the time of machines?

Jean-Louis Giavitto is Research Director at the CNRS and Deputy Director of the STMS lab (Sciences and Technologies of Music and Sound), a joint laboratory of CNRS, IRCAM and Sorbonne University. His research focuses on programming languages, in particular the mechanisms for computing a form that develops in space and time. These researches have been applied to the modelling and simulation of complex dynamic systems in biology (developmental processes) and music (analysis, composition, performance).
Conference : Can we tune the time of men and the time of machines?
22 novembre 2019 16:45 - Amphi Louis Armand
If music is an art of time, what kind of time is it? And is it possible to share this musical time between man and machine? These questions, which may seem abstract, become very tangible and pressing in mixed music where a computer must produce electronic sounds alongside human musicians. This presentation will focus on clarifying these questions and providing elements of answers based on the experiences with the Antescofo system, a computer system that allows the composer to define an electronic answer and to realize it taking into account the performer's musical interpretation during the concert.
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Jean-Paul Delahaye Jean-Paul Delahaye
Mathematician
Conference : Does Information Technology Change Time?

Jean-Paul Delahaye is professor emeritus at the University of Lille 1 and a researcher at CRISTAL (Research Center in Computer Science, Signal, and Automatics of Lille), a branch of the CNRS (French National Center for Scientific Research). His work deals with suite transformation algorithms, the use of logic in artificial intelligence, computational game theory, and algorithm theory in computer sciences, particularly as pertain to applications in finance. In 1998, he received the Prix d’Alembert from the Mathematics Society in France, and in 1999, he was awarded the Author’s Prize in Scientific Culture by the French Ministry of National Education and Research.
Conference : Does Information Technology Change Time?
21 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Calculations take time, but less and less so! The famous Gordon Moore law suggests that computer capacities to make calculations and memorize information double approximately every eighteen months. What took a year of calculations forty years ago now takes a million times less time, or 31 seconds. This reduction in processing time implies a range of consequences, including the possibility to create cryptographic currencies that can function without a central authority. And what about the future?
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Jean-Philippe Uzan Jean-Philippe Uzan
Cosmologist
Conference : Can we say that the universe is 13.8 Ma years old?

Jean-Philippe Uzan is a research director in theoretical physics at CNRS. He works at the Institut d’Astrophysics de Paris and is specialist in gravitation and cosmology. He was also the deputy director of Institut Henri Poincaré from 2013 to 2017. Besides his research he is involved in popularizing science and has been working with many artists. He wrote many books amog which « L’harmonie secrète de l’univers » in 2017 and « Big-bang » in 2018.
Conference : Can we say that the universe is 13.8 Ma years old?
23 novembre 2019 14:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
During the last century, modern cosmology has established a standard model that allows us to reconstruct the history, evolution and structuration of our universe. It concludes, in particular, that its age in 13.8 Gyr. What does such an affirmation means, what does it assumes and how is it backed up by observation? This talk will higlight the peculiarities of cosmology in order to gauge the credence to such claims.
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Jean-Sébastien Steyer Jean-Sébastien Steyer
Researcher - Paleontologist
Conference : Are fossils witnesses to evolution?

Jean-Sébastien Steyer is paleontologist at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle (MNHN), Paris. He is working on Life before the dinosaurs, with special emphasis on Pangean faunas, and on extinct species reconstruction. Beyond his research articles, he also writes popular books such as "Earth before the dinosaurs" (Indiana Univ Press, 2010) and popular articles about sciences in science-fiction. Between two fieldworks in Africa and Asia, this National Geographic Grantee is also chronicler in the French version of "Scientific American".
Conference : Are fossils witnesses to evolution?
22 novembre 2019 11:30 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Fossils are remains of organisms which have lived on Earth in the past : skeletons, shells, leaves, tree trunks, footprints, trackways, burrows, excrements etc, these organic "time capsules" are of various origins and correspond to natural objects studied by paleontologists. Often fragmentary and mineralized in rocks, these remains present sometimes exceptional preservation cases: this is the case in amber or permafrost. Whatever their preservation state, the fossils allow to better understand the evolution of environments and climates in the course of geological times. But what is the speculative part in the reconstruction work when the fossil is very fragmentary? And what is the advantage of adding fossils in the analyses of species relationships?
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Jeremy Saget Jeremy Saget
Doctor
Conference : What are the Times of an interplanetary « Reliance »?

Dr Jeremy Saget is an Aerospace Physician, Weightless Flight Surgeon and ZeroG Instructor (Novespace), MD, MS, EMBA. Flight Surgeon (rotary wing Aeromedical Evacuations) for UN Peace Keepers support. Committed one year to leprosy detection in Comores, Indian Ocean. Crew Commander for Mars Analog Missions in isolated conditions. Masters degree in cognitive science research from the Polytechnic Institute of Bordeaux, specialized in human factors. ATPL theoretical knowledge Instructor (Human Performance and Limitations, EASA ATO). Passionate about Human, space, exploration, science, STEM, advocate for the "Space for Anyone" era, currently working and writing about psychological aspects of ICE missions (Isolated Confined missions in an Extreme environment) and remote medicine challenges.
Conference : What are the Times of an interplanetary « Reliance »?
22 novembre 2019 12:15 - Amphi Louis Armand
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Julia Desojo Julia Desojo
Researcher - Paleontologist
Conference : When did dinosaurs appear?

Julia Desojo born in la Plata (Argentina) where she works and lives at present. She has a research position at CONICET (a government research service in Argentina). She did her PhD on the anatomy, phylogeny and biostratigraphy of aetosaurs from South America. During her first postdoc in Argentina, she studied the cranial biomechanics of aetosaurs. In 2007, she moved to Munich to carry out a Humboldt Fellowship studying von Huene’s South American Triassic reptiles, especially the rauisuchians. In 2009, she started working at the Vertebrate Paleontology section at Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales. In 2016, she moved permanently to the Vertebrate Paleontology Division of the Museo de La Plata, where she had been teaching since 2015 at the Universidad National de La Plata and work today. She focused primarily on Triassic archosauriforms worldwide. Her main interests are the anatomy, phylogeny and paleobiology of Triassic archosauriforms. Some of her research makes use of new techniques in paleobiology, such as paleohistology, CT scanning, morphometrics, and finite element analysis. An important component of her research also involves going to the field worldwide looking for new fossil remains of these fascinating reptiles. She manages to carry out these diverse studies and projects thanks to collaboration and cooperation with many national and international researchers, students, and friends.
Conference : When did dinosaurs appear?
21 novembre 2019 15:45 - Amphi Louis Armand
The origin of "true" dinosaurs was recorded from long time, at approximately 230 million years ago (ma). Although the oldest dinosaur footprints indicate that they were present even a couple millions years before. But, at that time, how was the landscape, temperature, and vegetation? Were the climatic conditions the same all around the world? Palaeontologist know that most of the continents were together, forming the supercontinent Pangea 250 ma ago, and the fauna was composed by several others animals besides first dinosaurs. However, many questions have not been answered yet, such as why dinosaurs survived at the end of the Triassic extinction? What was the advantage of dinosaur over other continental reptiles at that time? As paleontologists, we try to reconstruct the evolution of the dinosaur linage, discover the precursor of dinosaurs, and study their relationship with the coetaneous crocodilian ancestors. The Triassic record offers a window to the past allows us to travel through the geological time and put our sight on the origin of dinosaurs and the environments they lived in at the hundreds of millions year ago.
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Juliette Salmona Juliette Salmona
Violoncellist
Show : TimeWorldNight

Juliette Salmona was only 3 years old when she played her first notes on the cello. Five years later, she began her studies at the Paris Conservatory (C.N.R.) with Marcel Bardon, who remained her teacher for the next ten years. She then pursued her advanced studies at the National Superior Music Conservatory (C.N.S.M.) of Paris as a student of Jean-Marie Gamard and Jerome Pernoo. Since 2009, she has been cellist for the Quatuor Zaïde, winner of numerous prestigious international competitions. The quartet’s most recent recording (NoMadMusic) of Haydn’s complete string quartets opus 50 was widely hailed by the critics (receiving 4F from Telerama). The Quatuor Zaïde has performed in the most prestigious concert halls in Europe, such as the Wimore Hall in London, the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, the Konzerthaus in Vienna, and the Theâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris. Juliette Salmona is also involved in different projects in various musical styles, both as a soloist or a chamber musician.
Show : TimeWorldNight
23 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
What if we took Arnold Schoenberg for his word? ‘The transfigured night’ was inspired by Richard Dehmel’s poem. Wouldn’t it be more spectacular if we only had our ears to receive its beauty? After the poem being read in darkness, the audience would hear Schoenberg’s masterpiece in its sextet string version in the shade. This setting would allow the audience to experience the piece in a new way. A light projection will display dark colours to recreate a night atmosphere. The musicians will exist through their voice and the sound of their instruments. This experiment has never been made before because the six musicians will have to play by heart, with no partition or music stand. ‘The transfigured night’ was created between Germanic Romantism of the XIXth century’s and the modernism Shonenberg and its two disciples Berg and Webern established. Interpreted by Ana Millet, Juliette Salmona, Corentin Bordelot, David Haroutunian, Pauline Bartissol, Sarah Chanaf. Reading by Simon Abkarian.
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Laurence Honnorat Laurence Honnorat
CEO Innovaxiom

Laurence Honnorat founded INNOVAXIOM SAS in 2007, after 15 years spent in the Industry field. She was trained as a physicist and as a communication and marketing manager. INNOVAXIOM is a scientific popularization and ideas’ dissemination dedicated company. Laurence Honnorat hosts think tanks to elaborate organization and R&D strategies. She is a teacher in the higher education system (at CentraleSupelec Paris, University of Turku - Finland, ESIEE Paris...) and handles various aeras; such as ideas’ emergence, personal branding, social networks and communication. Laurence Honnorat is also behind the creation of INNOVAXIOM Corp in Boston in 2012. Laurence Honnorat is the cofounder of the Out Of Atmosphere Foundation, which purpose is to explore space and ideas. Laurence Honnorat just created We Need Your Brain, a knowledge and idea's network specialized in sciences. Meanwhile, she launched Iced Moment, a platform of pictures taken all over the world. In 2018, she invented the concept of Timeworld and decided to organize the event.
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Laurent de Wilde Laurent de Wilde
Pianist, composer, writer
Conference : Can musician make time?

Internationally renowned jazz pianist, Laurent de Wilde has been described as a exciting and passionate musician. Born in the United States in 1960, de Wilde spent his formative years (1964 to 1983) in France where he was immersed in French culture, music and literature eventually studying philosophy at the “Ecole Normale Supérieure” in Paris. Returning to the United States on a scholarship to further his musical knowledge, he studied jazz piano in New York where he resided for eight years. In the late 1980's he recorded his first albums with trumpet player Eddie Henderson and drummers Jack DeJohnette and Billy Hart. Returning to Paris in 1991, he continued his musical career touring throughout Europe, the United States and Japan. In 1993 he was awarded the Django Reinhardt Prize and in 1998 the “Victoires du Jazz”. In this period he also wrote his first book, a biography of Thelonious Monk that was published by Gallimard in 1996. The book received critical acclaim and has been translated and published in the United States, the U.K., Japan, Spain and Italy. After the turn on the century, de Wilde pursued a number of varied and intense projects including his Acoustic Trio, producing the album "Over the Clouds", In this period he also devoted himself to electronic music, a genre that challenged and inspired him to record six albums including “Fly” and “Fly Superfly”. He collaborated with artists such as the slammer/composer Abd Al Malik and comedian Jacques Gamblin. He ventured into TV with two documentaries for Arte on Thelonious Monk and Charles Mingus and released his second book "The Heroes of Sound " (published by Grasset), a saga of the inventors of keyboards in the twentieth century. Finally, to mark the centennial of Thelonious Monk's birthday and the twentieth anniversary of the publication of his Thelonious Monk biography, de Wilde's album titled "New Monk Trio" has been released.
Conference : Can musician make time?
22 novembre 2019 17:30 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Time created by music, outside of the usual perception of a biological time, is rooted in Jazz by the rythm section. A drummer and a bassist will in fact open a wide new space by playing in it, pushing the whole thing forward. The challenge is to hold together this musical and temporal construction in an efficient and harmonious way, which only gives an idea of the complexity of the aesthetic game at play !
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Leandro Lacapère Leandro Lacapère
Pianist and composer
Show : TimeWorldTango

Léandro enrolled in the Gennevilliers Conservatory at the age of 22 to devote himself entirely to tango. What draws him to this type of music is its spirit of revolt. With Juanjo Mosalini and Diego Aubia, he learned the styles, technique, and spirit of tango. He also fell in love with this music and now has a command of the energy it contains and elicits. Meanwhile, he continued practicing the piano with Josette Morata, and learned to write with Didier Louis. Fascinated by Osvaldo Pugliese and his orchestra, he conceived this music with an ear to the ground to tell the stories of the lives and aspirations of the voiceless. As a composer, he seeks to preserve the irony, breaks, and dizzying spells that let the tango paint the misery and violence of society without descending into despair.
Show : TimeWorldTango
21 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Tangomotán members seek to improvise and never cease to work on new covers, revisit tunes, evolve and free themselves in order to make tango tangible. Walls will be covered by images while a voice will join instruments and the scene will become a theatre. Time stops during a concert: the past, the present and the future meet and communicate one to another. Everything has changed. It’s all the same.
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Leo Aschenbrenner Boonstra Leo Aschenbrenner Boonstra
Student
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?

Leo Aschenbrenner Boonstra is originally from Sweden but is a Classics student at the University of Edinburgh. He is especially interested in Greek literature and philosophy, which still have the power to help us understand the world. Another field of interest is how more modern perspectives and theories, such as psychoanalysis, can be applied to classical literature. At Swedish high school Södra Latin, he studied a broad program focused on languages and literature. For several years during his childhood, he used to sing in a boys’ choir.
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?
23 novembre 2019 14:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Our daily life seems to be articulated around omnipresent accelerations. Automated transports, automatic correctors, search engines, notifications... We are used to knowing the result of a crucial election in real time, we can even automatically replay the crucial goal of a thrilling match online within seconds. Access to information is so rapid that the distance from events to the present seems to be fading away and the length of time that separates us from events in the near future seems to be shrinking. The digital even proposes to accelerate our private lives by organizing romantic meetings in one click! But does speeding up really save time? This is the question that six students will discuss at this roundtable. Their goal will be to highlight the relationship millennials maintain within our current society and impact of the quickening pace it imposes on us.
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Louis Janicot Louis Janicot
Lawyer
Workshop : Does law got time?

Louis Janicot holds both a law degree (La Sorbonne Law School) and Business (ESSEC Busines School). He is actually a Doctorate candidate in Financial Law at la Sorbonne Law School. Teaching assistant at La Sorbonne Law School, Lecturer at Ecole Central, Associated Expert and Lecturer at the European Center for Law and Economics ESSEC, he teaches Private, Business and International Law. This research focus on economic and financial regulation, public and private governance and law and economics. He’s a consultant of various NGO involved in fighting and preventing white collar crimes he provides them with an expertise on the analyses of cases and on legislative advocacy. He’s also a patrician in alternative conflicts resolution.
Workshop : Does law got time?
22 novembre 2019 14:00 - Room A2
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Marc Lachièze-Rey Marc Lachièze-Rey
Astrophysicist
Conference : What does ‘time’ even mean?

Marc Lachièze-Rey is a french astrophysicist, cosmologist and theorist at CNRS, working in the laboratory 'AstroParticule and Cosmology' (APC) in Paris. He also teaches at the 'Ecole Centrale' Paris. His scientific publications interests include the topology of space-time, gravity and dark matter. His most important publications include: Au-delà de l'Espace et du temps (2003), Voyager dans le temps : La physique moderne et la temporalité (2013), Einstein à la plage (2015).
Conference : What does ‘time’ even mean?
23 novembre 2019 09:15 - Amphi Gaston Berger
In our everyday lives and in some simple problems of physics, we tend to use time. Yet, modern physics (defined by Einstein’s theory of relativity) tells us clearly that time does not exist in nature. For example, clocks measure durations, not time – two closely-related but very different notions. Time is a construction based on durations, and not the inverse. And it can only be constructed through approximations and under certain conditions. Those are the conditions that allow us to use time, yet with limited precision.
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Marie-Maude Roy Marie-Maude Roy
Student
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?

Marie-Maude Roy completed her B.Sc. in physics at the Université de Montréal and is now part of the Artefact Lab where she is doing an interdisciplinary Master's degree in Physics and Communication. This project focuses on the mechanisms of production and transmission of scientific knowledge and especially on visualizations of physical time. More generally, Marie-Maude is interested in science and technology studies, popular science and the intersection of art and science.
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?
23 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Our daily life seems to be articulated around omnipresent accelerations. Automated transports, automatic correctors, search engines, notifications... We are used to knowing the result of a crucial election in real time, we can even automatically replay the crucial goal of a thrilling match online within seconds. Access to information is so rapid that the distance from events to the present seems to be fading away and the length of time that separates us from events in the near future seems to be shrinking. The digital even proposes to accelerate our private lives by organizing romantic meetings in one click! But does speeding up really save time? This is the question that six students will discuss at this roundtable. Their goal will be to highlight the relationship millennials maintain within our current society and impact of the quickening pace it imposes on us.
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Marilou Niedda Marilou Niedda
Student
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?

Marilou Niedda is currently doing a Masters degree in Sciences Po Lyon about international relations. During a break year, she studied philosophy while working for an association of documentary film makers on the theme of housing. After having studied social sciences at the University of Edinburgh, Marilou guided her fields of research towards critical studies in political theory, with a particular interest on gender issues.
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?
23 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Our daily life seems to be articulated around omnipresent accelerations. Automated transports, automatic correctors, search engines, notifications... We are used to knowing the result of a crucial election in real time, we can even automatically replay the crucial goal of a thrilling match online within seconds. Access to information is so rapid that the distance from events to the present seems to be fading away and the length of time that separates us from events in the near future seems to be shrinking. The digital even proposes to accelerate our private lives by organizing romantic meetings in one click! But does speeding up really save time? This is the question that six students will discuss at this roundtable. Their goal will be to highlight the relationship millennials maintain within our current society and impact of the quickening pace it imposes on us.
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Marion Chiron Marion Chiron
Bandoneon
Show : TimeWorldTango

Marion Chiron studied at the Conservatoire à Rayonnement Régional in Cergy Pontoise where she received her First Prize at the age of 15. Marion has been studying at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, Finland since September 2014. She is currently in her third year of a bachelor’s degree in Musical Interpretation under Mika Väyrynen. Marion performs as a soloist and as part of many chamber music ensembles, including the Modern Tango Orchestra Fleurs Noires and the duo Ilmatar, together with the Spanish saxophonist Beatriz Tirado. She has performed in Paris, at the Studio de l’Ermitage, Triton, and New Morning in Tomás Gubitsch’s company. Abroad, she has participated in a series of concerts in Rome (Palladium Theater), Rotterdam (De Doelen), Sivolde, Mallorca, Segovia, and Madrid (Radio Clasica).
Show : TimeWorldTango
23 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Tangomotán members seek to improvise and never cease to work on new covers, revisit tunes, evolve and free themselves in order to make tango tangible. Walls will be covered by images while a voice will join instruments and the scene will become a theatre. Time stops during a concert: the past, the present and the future meet and communicate one to another. Everything has changed. It’s all the same.
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Martin Krzywinski Martin Krzywinski
Data Scientist
Conference : Does DNA record time?

Martin Krzywinski is known for his work in bioinformatics, data visualization and the interface of science and art. He applies design, both data and artistic, to assist discovery, explanation and engagement with scientific data and concepts. His information graphics have appeared in the New York Times, Wired, Scientific American and covers of numerous books and scientific journals such as Nature and Genome Research.
Conference : Does DNA record time?
22 novembre 2019 16:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
What is today's date? Don't worry if you don't remember. You can always check using the timekeeping device you always have with you -- your DNA! It will rarely lie about your true age. No matter how hard you try to fight age (and fight you should!), there's no fooling our internal biological timekeeper. Recent advancements in genome sequencing have given us a glimpse how our bodies record our age. In fact, our body's long-term clock is perfectly distributed: as we age, the DNA in each cell of our bodies subtly changes. Called epigenetic modifications, these changes alter how our genes are expressed and directly influences how our cells (and our bodies) function. For now, you may need to rely on diet, exercise and (optionally) face creams to feel young. But in not-so-distant future we may be able to rewind our epigenetic clocks to make the body forget that time has passed.
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Maxime Abolgassemi Maxime Abolgassemi
Professor and Writer
Conference : Did Victor Hugo Buy Time for Big Data?

Maxime Abolgassemi teaches literature and culture in classes préparatoires at Lycée Chateaubriand in Rennes. An advocate for educational reform, he has published a book to promote creative writing in French schools. With his experience on different selection committees and as an educator, he has developed a practical method to evaluate the various aspects that go into “personality interview” tests during oral entrance exams for France’s prestigious higher education institutions (grandes écoles). He holds a doctorate in literature from the Paris-Sorbonne University and a master’s degree in theoretical physics from Pierre and Marie Curie University. He has his agrégation in modern literature. His work focuses on Surrealist “objective chance”, his own notion of counter-fiction, and democratic transparency. In 2017, he published his first novel, Nuit Persane, which takes readers to Teheran in the years leading up to the Iranian Revolution.
Conference : Did Victor Hugo Buy Time for Big Data?
22 novembre 2019 14:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
The rise of algorithms capable of processing and interpreting metadata will buy us an incredible amount of time in almost all fields, including in the prevention of diseases and detection of fraud. This extraordinary innovation is embedded in a larger foundational logical model: the world of Democratic Transparency, which is not always properly recognized. Yet, art and literature have played a major role in this phenomenon. Big data – and likely also future iterations of Artificial Intelligence – is grounded in three conditions: universalization, egalitarianism, and value inversion. The last of these characteristics has traversed Art History, appearing in the Surrealist “lost object” and Modern Art, before at last being developed digitally by our new infrastructures of calculation. And Victor Hugo was the one who, in a key scene in Les Misérables, provided us with our starting point.
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Meredith Nash Meredith Nash
Sociologist and writer
Conference : Does time have a gender?

Dr Meredith Nash is Deputy Director of the Institute for the Study of Social Change and Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the University of Tasmania in Australia. Her research focuses on gendered inequalities in everyday life. She is the author of Making Postmodern Mothers: Pregnant Embodiment, Baby Bumps, and Body Image (2012), editor of Reframing Reproduction: Conceiving Gendered Experiences (2014), and co-editor of Reading Lena Dunham’s Girls: Feminism, Postfeminism, Authenticity, and Gendered Performance in Contemporary Television (2017).
Conference : Does time have a gender?
23 novembre 2019 10:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Paradigms of temporality and gendered identity are garnering renewed critical attention. Drawing on Kristeva’s germinal 1979 essay ‘Women’s Time’ (Les temps des femmes), this talk highlights the contributions of feminism to theories of temporality. Traversing contemporary and historical examples from biological clocks to #metoo to Newtonian physics, we broadly explore complex questions around the significance of time for feminist political and historical practice, the impact of time use on diverse gender and sexual identities, the relationship between time and gendered power, and the ways that time is measured and valued culturally.
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Michael Craig Gradwell Michael Craig Gradwell
Professor

Michael is a communication trainer and coach at leading French engineering universities. He provides graduate and postgraduate level courses on creativity, interpersonal dynamics and team development, creative communication and innovative project management. He is a visiting professor of project management at Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Cape Town, and Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa. He has also carried out missions for business and public administration in France, Germany and Italy. He works fluently in English, French and Italian. His current work ratio is 30% consulting and coaching, 30% teaching, 20% pro bono & 20% research and development.
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Michel Tognini Michel Tognini
Astronaut
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?

Michel Ange-Charles Tognini (born September 30, 1949 in Vincennes, France) is a French test pilot, Brigadier General in the French Air Force, and a former CNES and ESA astronaut who serves from 01.01.2005 to 01.11.2011 as Head of the European Astronaut Centre of the European Space Agency. A veteran of two space flights, Tognini has logged a total of 19 days in space. Tognini has 4000 flight hours on 80 types of aircraft (mainly fighter aircraft including the MiG-25, Tupolev 154, Lightning MK-3 and MK-5, Gloster Meteor, and F-104).
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?
21 novembre 2018 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
The countdown starts early. At the beginning of the selection to become an astronaut, or even as soon as the idea of ​​making the trip out of the atmosphere crosses the mind of the candidate. Everything is then linked, step by step, success after success, until the ultimate consecration when the contender is part of the team, the one that brings together extraordinary human beings, ready to follow the training mission for an adventure into space. Many months of intensive preparation, with a meticulously planned program, still separate the future hero from the last seconds of the countdown. The astronaut has to keep making progress every day. A few hours before they take off, the crew are placed into quarantine. On the launching ramp, curled up in their seats, they will be propelled into space within the deadline imposed by the launching procedure. In less than nine minutes, they will travel at an orbital speed of 28,000 km / h and will pass around the Earth 16 times each day. The real mission has just begun. Whether it is to ensure proper operation of the instruments, to repair them, to carry out scientific experiments, to communicate with Earth, to interact with their teammates, to sleep, to eat, the astronauts evolve at a certain pace, a pace which is imposed upon them by the trials of space. Although they are very busy, the return to Earth, close to where their loved ones reside can sometimes seem so far away. At each stage, even during an extravehicular exit or the return trip to Earth: is it possible for astronauts to challenge time?
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Michel Viso Michel Viso
Exobiologist

Michel Viso was a veterinarian for many years. He enrolled in Alfort Veterinary School in 1980 and the National Institute of Agronomical Research in 1981. He was chosen to be an astronaut by the French space agency, CNES, in 1985. He collaborated on the RHESUS Project in cooperation with NASA. His prospects of traveling to space evaporated in 1993 when NASA ended the project. He then went on to ensure scientific responsibility in animal physiological and biological space experiments performed in cooperation with the United States, Russia, and other partners. In 2004, CNES named him to the position of scientific manager for Exobiology, in preparation for French participation in the European project Exomars and future exploration missions in the solar system, including new projects on sample returns from Mars in the 2030s. He represents the CNES on COSPAR’s Panel for Planetary Protection.
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Moreno Andreatta Moreno Andreatta
Researcher
Conference : Music, an art of time or an art of space?

Moreno Andreatta holds a Master degree in mathematics at the University of Pavia and a piano diploma at the Conservatory of Novara, in Italy. He obtained a PhD in computational musicology at the EHESS and is at the present CNRS director of research at the Sciences and Technology of Music Lab (an IRCAM, CNRS and Sorbonne University joint Laboratory). He is currently invited researcher at the University of Strasbourg where he is the principal investigator of the SMIR (Structural Music Information) project and where he also teaches formal models applied to song analysis within the Popular Music Bachelor program. He is founding member of the Journal of Mathematics and Music and Vice-President of the Society for Mathematics and Computation in Music.
Conference : Music, an art of time or an art of space?
22 novembre 2019 16:15 - Amphi Louis Armand
Mathematics has accompanied the reflection on the theoretical foundations of music since old times. It has become essential in computational music analysis, especially because of the deep link between theoretical formalisation and computer-aided modelling of musical structures and processes. What role do play or can play the different spatial and temporal representations of musical structures and processes? Beyond these theoretical and computational aspects, "mathemusical" research raises social issues that directly affect the outreach with respect to specialists (musicologists, composers and scientists) as well as to the general audience. This conference-concert is the result of a collaborative work between a researcher and a stage director. It will show the interest of approaching music in its double component, both spatial and temporal, and without an ideological and often superficial separation between different musical practices belonging to contemporary art music versus popular music.
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Nayla Tamraz Nayla Tamraz
Professor
Conference : Can Art Define What’s Contemporary?

Nayla Tamraz is a Lebanese writer, art critic, curator, researcher and professor of Literature and Art History at Saint Joseph University of Beirut. She obtained her PhD in Comparative Literature (Literature and Art) from the New Sorbonne University (Paris III) in 2004. In 2010, she designed, proposed and launched the MA in Art Criticism and Curatorial Studies that she heads. Nayla Tamraz has also designed, organized, curated and co-curated several cultural events including the symposium "Littérature, Art et Monde Contemporain: Récits, Histoire, Mémoire" (2014, Beirut) and the exhibition "Poetics, Politics, Places" that took place in Tucumán, Argentina, from September to December 2017, in the frame of the International Biennale of Contemporary Art of South America (BienalSur). Nayla Tamraz' current research explores the issues related to the comparative theory and aestetics of literature and art, which brings her to the topics of history, memory and narratives in literature and art in post-war Lebanon.] Since 2014, she's been developing a multi-disciplinary seminar and research platform on the paradigm of modernity. Her research leads her to question the relationship between poetics and politics as well as the representations associated with the notion of territory.
Conference : Can Art Define What’s Contemporary?
22 novembre 2019 10:00 - Amphi Louis Armand
“The contemporary is not current”. That was how Roland Barthes summed up Nietzsche’s thinking in a lecture note for a course at the Collège de France. In What is the Contemporary?, Giorgio Agamben writes: “The person who truly belongs to their time, the true contemporary, is someone who does not perfectly coincide with their time or its pretensions, and can, in this sense, be described to be someone who is not current; but it is precisely because of this gap and this anachronism that this person is best able to perceive and understand their time”. What is this time which philosophers invite us to consider, and which we can better understand from a distance? What is this strange time dimension which exists through us? And what does it demand of us?
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Normand Mousseau Normand Mousseau
Professor and Writer
Conference : Do atoms take their time?

Normand Mousseau is a professor of physics at the Université de Montréal and director of the Trottier Energy Institute at Polytechnique Montréal. Specialist, especially, of the long-time evolution of complex materials, including metal alloys, glasses and proteins, he is also interested in the popularization of science. For six years, he produced and hosted the weekly science program "La grande équation" on Radio VM in Quebec .The question of change is of interest to him at all levels, and he is also pursuing work in energy and climate policy. He has published several general public books on the subject. His most recent, "Winning the Climate War. Twelve myths to debunk " was published, in French, in 2017.
Conference : Do atoms take their time?
21 novembre 2019 17:30 - Amphi Louis Armand
How does matter around us evolve? Does it have an integrated clock? Do all matters age the same way? We often ask these questions when we think of the living -- the answers, then, are a matter or perception or biology. What about, however, protons, atoms, and various materials around us? Each seems to live at his own pace, as we will see, in a universe that seems very far from ours even though, we are all part of it.
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Patrice Serres Patrice Serres
Comic cartoonist and sinologist
Conference : What is the origin of time writing?

Patrice Serres is a Parisian comic artist, specialized in comics about aviation and animals. He is also an editor and producer, who works in different types of media. He was an art teacher when he made his debut with comic adaptations of Claude Rank's 'La Route de Corinthe' and Albert Simonin's 'Max le Menteur' in France-Soir. He then spent a couple of years in the USA, where he assisted Frank Robbins on 'Johnny Hazard'. Back in France since 1967, he made short stories and editorial pages for magazines Pilote and Formule 1, sometimes using the pseudonym Esdé. He created the aviation series 'Yves Sainclair' with Claude Moliterni in Phénix, that was collected in two books by Dargaud in 1975 and 1976. In the same genre, Serres took over the artwork of 'Tanduy & Laverdure' comic by Jean-Michel Charlier, following the death of Jijé. He made an adaptation of Bernard Werber's 'Les Fourmis', about the life of ants, for L'Écho des Savanes in 1994, and created 'Le Bal des Abeilles', a book about bees, with Rémy Chauvin for Éditions du Goral in 2001. In 2007, he made 'Les Forçats de la Route', a comics chronicle of the Tour de France of 1924 through the eyes of journalist Albert Londres. Serres additionally worked as an deputy editor of Tintin magazine in the 1970s, and contributed to the revival of the title with serializations of popular comics like 'Blueberry' and 'Lucky Luke'. He was editor-in-chief of the satirical weekly Hara-Kiri between 1984 and 1991 and served as manager of Yu Pruductions. Besides print, Serres developed radio shows like 'La Radio à Roulettes' for France Musique in 1977, and Trésors Vivants for France Culture in 1978. He has worked as a producer for France Inter, Antenne 2, FR3 and Canal+ in the 1980s, and has designed stamps for La Poste from 2003. He is furthermore known to be a sinologist, following a trip to China during the Cultural Revolution in the 1960s. He has used his knowledge on the subject for his comic about the life of Qin Shi Huangdi, the first Chinese emperor.
Conference : What is the origin of time writing?
23 novembre 2019 14:00 - Amphi Louis Armand
The first pastoral civilisations punctuated the cycle of seasons according to the precession of the 12 moons, which ordered the beginning and end of their main agricultural tasks. Systematizing the division of time, these cultures were led to give an archetypical meaning to the first 12 natural numbers, which therefore got the exorbitant power of activating the main occult might: time. Numbers still keep nowadays this immemorial power active. A single sign written on a material support supposed to be solid became thus able to travel towards the future and keep readable in a new present time. This feature has already been operating during several millennia. It may keep running during a long time ahead, whatever happens, since its very users generate its genuine driving force. Embracing a large horizon of cultures from the Mediterranean area to China, we may follow the migrations and mutations of these 12 unique symbols and bring to light the shared origins of devices so different as Zodiac signs, calendars, time systems, measurements, alphabets and even video and strategy games. This archaic feature has shown a tremendous progeny revealing the implicit tracks of an invisible order, which still govern us today. Unknowingly, the mental organization of the people of our time remains largely liable to it.
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Pauline Bartissol Pauline Bartissol
violoncellist
Show : TimeWorldNight

Graduate of the National Conservatoire of Paris (CNSM) and the MusikHochschule of Cologne, holding a cello CA, Pauline Bartissol is an eclectic cellist whose musical life reflects her curiosity and will to share with other artists. 2nd Cello Solo at the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio-France since 2007, she is also a teacher assistant to Marc Coppey at the National Conservatoire of Paris (CNSM) since September 2013 and regularly plays chamber music in reknowned festivals (Quincena Musicale de San Sebastian, Bilbao and Vitoria Festival, Juventus Festival, Heures musicales du musée d’Orsay, Return Festival of Erevan…).More surprisingly, she sometimes appears in more unexpected repertoire such as the duo formed with the saxophonist Jean-Charles Richard or as part of the feminin trio Salzedo she created in 2015 with the flutist Marine Pérez and the harpist Frédérique Cambreling. The Salzedo trio is a singular chamber music ensemble setting itself apart with diversified projects and repertoires.
Show : TimeWorldNight
23 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
What if we took Arnold Schoenberg for his word? ‘The transfigured night’ was inspired by Richard Dehmel’s poem. Wouldn’t it be more spectacular if we only had our ears to receive its beauty? After the poem being read in darkness, the audience would hear Schoenberg’s masterpiece in its sextet string version in the shade. This setting would allow the audience to experience the piece in a new way. A light projection will display dark colours to recreate a night atmosphere. The musicians will exist through their voice and the sound of their instruments. This experiment has never been made before because the six musicians will have to play by heart, with no partition or music stand. ‘The transfigured night’ was created between Germanic Romantism of the XIXth century’s and the modernism Shonenberg and its two disciples Berg and Webern established. Interpreted by Ana Millet, Juliette Salmona, Corentin Bordelot, David Haroutunian, Pauline Bartissol, Sarah Chanaf. Reading by Simon Abkarian.
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Philippe Nicolas Philippe Nicolas
Teacher
Workshop : Your vision board

Philippe Nicolas has been a teacher at schools within the Hauts de Seine urban area of France for sixteen years. He is also Docteur ès Sciences in education and environmental training and the author of books published by Souffle D’or, Transboreal, and Dunod. He is a conference speaker on innovation and his educational papers are regularly published in La Main à la Pâte under the auspices of the Académie of Sciences of Paris. Philippe Nicolas has an original approach to teaching by appealing to the practical side of children’s experience and by reconnecting his pupils to the world of Nature. He is a teacher who encourages his pupils to explore the real world as well as writing about it. He has taken part in the production of a number of short films, most recently in Julien Peron’s « L’Ecole de la Vie ». As fly fisherman, he aims to become part of the universal experience which encompasses the world and the abundance of the rivers.
Workshop : Your vision board
23 novembre 2019 11:45 - Room A1
45 minutes to get a clear idea of your objectives. A « vision board » is a visual collage of images, photos and your dreams, and more generally of things which make you happy. In this workshop I will work with you to create a visual presentation of your shorter and longer terms aspirations. This will give you a practical tool to help you both to visualise your objectives and to work towards the successful realization of your deepest ambitions.
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Pierre Odru Pierre Odru
Engineer

Pierre Odru has been a research engineer at the French Petroleum Institute (IFP) for 25 years. He has vast experience in perfecting deep-sea petroleum production technologies in cooperation with French and international corporations. Through his involvement in new energy technologies like storage, energy efficiency, hydrogen, and wind power, Pierre has been responsible for tendering within the French National Agency of Research. The author of several books, lecture organizer, and instructor, he is particularly interested in cosmology, quantum mechanics, and general relativity. A former climber, he is now a trekker and high-elevation mountain enthusiast.
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Pierre Zielinsky Pierre Zielinsky
Airline pilot
Conference : Is time the aviator’s enemy?

Pierre Zielinsky is an airline pilot, after a long first part of career as a military pilot. This first part indeed took place in the French air force during nineteen years, more precisely in the governmental and presidential air lines, the 60th Transport Squadron based in Vélizy-Villacoublay. After graduating from the French air force Academy in Salon-de-Provence (1998 « Général Heurtaux » class of entry), he began as a copilot, then captain and instructor successively on Dassault Falcon 50, 900 and Airbus A330. In addition to his pilot specialty, he also held high responsibility positions : chief pilot Falcon (2008-2010), assigned to French air force headquarters (2010-2012), chief of operations (2012-2014), then squadron commander (2015-2017), in charge of 150 servicemen, 5 different fleets of aircraft and thousands of flight hours with high-ranking passengers carried out yearly without incident. All along his career, flight safety, excellence of service and quality of training have driven him. Today, Pierre works for Air France, on Airbus A320.
Conference : Is time the aviator’s enemy?
22 novembre 2019 11:30 - Amphi Louis Armand
« Time critical » : 208 seconds. This is what Captain Chesley Sullenberger and his crew needed to bring their aircraft down for a water landing on the Hudson River in 2009. This figure is both long and vertiginously short. In aeronautics today, as it has always been, the race against time is everywhere : technology, maintenance, application of procedures, military operations, but also - and maybe mainly – in the aviators’ exercise of cognitive functions. Pilots’ training, especially oriented toward the improvement of these skills rather than a sterile repetition of manoeuvers, aim at a better awareness of the time factor in the exercise of leadership and management of workload in an aircraft cockpit, whether it be flown single pilot or with a crew. Indeed, this factor appears rapidly as an unavoidable and stressful obstacle for a time-pressured aviator, even in normal situations. But in the end, when having a closer look, would time not be more a weapon for safety and the pilot’s ally ?
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Pierre-François Mouriaux Pierre-François Mouriaux
Journalist
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?

After studying history and especially the Conquest of Space during the Cold War, Pierre-François Mouriaux committed himself to the promotion of space culture. He has been responsible for the follow-up of the French aerospace clubs within the Planète Sciences association, was in charge of the space collections at the Air and Space Museum of Le Bourget, and coordinated the technical program of the annual Congress of the International Astronautical Federation, before joining the weekly Air & Cosmos Magazine at the end of 2015, where he currently runs the space section. Initiator and president of the association Histoires d'espace, Pierre-François regularly organizes public events around space. He is the author or co-author of a dozen books, mostly for young people, on astronauts and solar system exploration. Many of them have been translated abroad, including the famous Comment on fait pipi dans l’espace ?, which has won two awards. He has also written two books for the general public relating Thomas Pesquet’s mission aboard the International Space Station in 2016-2017.
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?
21 janvier 2019 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
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Pierre-Henri Gouyon Pierre-Henri Gouyon
Genetics researcher
Conference : Does biodiversity change over time?

Pierre-Henri Gouyon is an agricultural engineer and holds a doctorate in ecology and genetics, as well as a doctorate in science. He has also been trained in philosophy and the history of science. He is currently a professor at the National Museum of Natural History at AgroParisTech, Sciences Po, and ENS. His research deals with genetic evolution, ecology, biodiversity, and the relationship between science and society. He gives public lectures on a variety of topics and regularly appears in the media: newspapers, radio, television, and online. He has participated in a number of government and other types of initiatives; he is the president of the Scientific Board for the Nicolas Hulot Foundation.
Conference : Does biodiversity change over time?
22 novembre 2019 10:45 - Amphi Louis Armand
Whatever his or her religion, most of us have heard of Adam and Eva before hearing about Darwin. Our mental structure has been built upon a fixist vision of a world resting in a stable equilibrium. However, the very fact of Evolution teaches us that such an equilibrium does not exist. Biodiversity should thus be seen as a dynamic instead of a state. What are the forces which act within this dynamic, can we understand and act upon the present collapse in the light of this point of view?
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Pierre-Yves Plat Pierre-Yves Plat
Pianist
Show : Pianist

As he begins to play a classical masterpiece, he bows his head and puffs out his cheeks in apparent tedium before throwing a cheeky glance towards the audience and breaking into his own ragtime rendition. Never sat still, he dances out of his stool, getting carried away towards the end, bashing out the high notes with his toes. The young virtuoso is even capable of exciting the crowd enough to sing along to his more contemporary rearrangements. Pierre-Yves Plat succeeds in creating a musical cross between humour and fantasy, classical and jazz, a real show! With the glory of participating in the film "Un bonheur n’arrive jamais seul" with Sophie Marceau, in which he played the double of Gad Elmaleh’s hands in the interpretations of his own piano arrangements Pierre-Yves Plat also enamoured us at the "Choregies d’Orange 2012" in front of 8,000 people, sharing the stage with Laurent Gerra, Adamo and the Monte Carlo Philharminic Orchestra and others. His speciality: adapting classical pieces into Jazz. His dexterity and astonishing swing make him surely one of the most talented pianists of his generation.
Show : Pianist
Amphi Gaston Berger
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Purificación López-García Purificación López-García
Biologist
Conference : Can we puzzle out the origin of life?

Purificación López-García is a Research Director working for the French CNRS and the leader of the “Microbial diversity, ecology and evolution” research group at the Ecology Systematics Evolution unit (CNRS & University Paris-Sud/Paris-Saclay). She obtained her PhD in Sciences (Biology) from the Autonomous University of Madrid (Spain) in 1992, working on the genome structure of halophilic archaea. She spent several years as postdoc (Marie Curie fellow and others) and associated professor in various institutions (Université Paris-Sud, France; Universidad Miguel Hernandez and Universidad de Alicante, Spain; Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France), before she entered the CNRS as a researcher in 2002. Her scientific career has been marked by a profound interest on the extent and limits of life and on how evolution has led to the diversification of major organismal lines. Her research group combines complementary approaches, from the exploration of extant prokaryotic (archaea, bacteria) and eukaryotic diversity in diverse environments, including extreme and strongly mineralized settings, to phylogenomics and metagenomics, with the aim of elucidating the order of emergence of the different microbial groups and testing hypotheses on early biological evolution.
Conference : Can we puzzle out the origin of life?
21 novembre 2019 12:15 - Amphi Gaston Berger
For a long time, the question of the origin of life could not be explained through scientific means, and was instead monopolized by different religions, which offered faith-based answers. Scientific study – or the search for natural causes – on the origin of life did not really begin until the mid-nineteenth century. At that time, Louis Pasteur refuted the idea of spontaneous generation (in which life can appear at any moment) and Charles Darwin published his revolutionary book The Origin of Species, in which he proposed the idea of a novel mechanism – natural selection – to explain how species transformed. To follow his reasoning to its logical conclusions: if all species are the outcome of transformations in prior species, they must come from an ultimate first species. Meanwhile, progress in biochemistry, with the first syntheses of organic compounds in laboratories, gave rise to the first scientific postulates on the origin of life. In the twentieth century, sweeping scientific advances were made: from the development of molecular biology to spatial and chemical explorations of the universe. What do we know about the origin of life at the dawn of the twenty-first century? We can now realistically situate the transition between the living and the non-living and offer ever-subtler hypotheses.
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Raphaël Didjaman Raphaël Didjaman
Musicien

First Saxophonist and Deejay at the age of 20, then Didgeridoo pioneer in France since 1995, date back from Australia, after a long time spent in the Out back, he becomes manufacturer-luthier and professional of Didgeridoo. He founded the label TRIBAL ZIK RECORDS in 2007, and defends the didgeridoo mixed with poetry and all types of music. Raphaël Didjaman has produced a discography of 10 albums to date, including a trilogy on the poet Arthur Rimbaud, with an eloquent list of actors and singers of the French scene. His collaborations with composers Bruno Coulais (Le peuple migrateur) and Philippe Sarde (Quai d'Orsay) will lead him to compose for the sake of music to the image and to become a solo didgeridoo player in the Divertimento Symphony Orchestra conducted by Zahia Zouani.
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René Kauffmann René Kauffmann
Engineer

Having achieved studies in Aeronautical engineering, though literary by temperament, René Kauffmann held from 1970 to 2008 various positions in industrial research. He spent many years designing computer interfaces and search engines for technical documents searching in various languages. He thus accompanied the technical evolution from the archaic computer to the advent of internet browsers. He now applies these same techniques to the dissemination of knowledge on Mediterranean Archeology, animating AnticoPedie website. As for Time, he cooperated with the "Museum of Ancient Greek Technologies", adapting in French the descriptions of ancient devices, including those showing the time or measuring durations.
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Roland Lehoucq Roland Lehoucq
Astrophysicist
Conference : Can We Really Travel Into the Future?

Roland Lehoucq is an astrophysicist working in the field of astrophysics for CEA Saclay. He teaches at the Ecole Polytechnique and the Institut d’études Politiques. Passionate about sharing scientific knowledge, he is a regular contributor to the monthly magazine Pour la Science, and he has written a column in the science-fiction magazine Bifrost for the past 19 years. He has written many articles targeted at a general readership in mass-consumption science magazines and gives approximately fifty lectures per year. He has also published or contributed to 30 books and collaborated on many exhibits at the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie, Palais de la Découverte, and Cité de l’Espace. Since 2012, he has presided over Utopiales, an international science-fiction festival in Nantes. In 2010, he was awarded the Diderot-Curien Prize by the Association of Museums and Centers for the Development of Scientific, Technical, and Industrial Culture. In January 2014, he was knighted by the Palmes Académiques. And in January 2018, he received the French Legion of Honor.
Conference : Can We Really Travel Into the Future?
21 novembre 2019 16:15 - Amphi Gaston Berger
There was once a time when we thought that time was the same for everyone. In 1905, Einstein published his theory on special relativity, a theory that would undermine our previous notions of space and time. In 1915, his general relativity radically shifted our understanding of gravitation, which became intimately linked to space-time. Through an analysis of science-fiction films, we will illustrate and explain revolutionary concepts that emerged more than a century ago. This will help us understand how these theories form the basis of satellite positioning and to what extent they may allow us to travel into the future.
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Rémi Camus Rémi Camus
Adventurer
Athletics roundtable : Can we beat time?

Rémi Camus is not a sportsman like the others. Overnight, when he was only 26 years old, Remi left his job in a Michelin star restaurant. His head is elsewhere and his body takes him to new adventures when he decides to cross Australia by foot (5,400 km), then to go down the Mekong by hydrospeed swim (4,400 km) or to swim around France (2,650 km). Today he continues to explore the world with his own means, while sensitizing people on the state of the waters on the planet.
Athletics roundtable : Can we beat time?
23 novembre 2019 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
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Samia Mahé Samia Mahé
Student
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?

After studying literature at preparatory school Samia Mahé entered ENS Lyon where she is currently a student in contemporary philosophy and cognitive science. Her fields of research are mainly guided towards consciousness and emotions. The research Samia has done for her Master 1 and Master 2 degrees deals with philosophy of spirit, with questions of the definition and naturalization of consciousness. At the same time, she is leading some research in cognitive science about the influence of emotions on cognitive skills (attention, memory, decision making…) and more widely, on skills like learning and social interactions.
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?
23 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Our daily life seems to be articulated around omnipresent accelerations. Automated transports, automatic correctors, search engines, notifications... We are used to knowing the result of a crucial election in real time, we can even automatically replay the crucial goal of a thrilling match online within seconds. Access to information is so rapid that the distance from events to the present seems to be fading away and the length of time that separates us from events in the near future seems to be shrinking. The digital even proposes to accelerate our private lives by organizing romantic meetings in one click! But does speeding up really save time? This is the question that six students will discuss at this roundtable. Their goal will be to highlight the relationship millennials maintain within our current society and impact of the quickening pace it imposes on us.
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Sandra Magnus Sandra Magnus
Astronaut - NASA
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?

Sandra Hall Magnus is an American engineer and a former NASA astronaut. She returned to Earth with the crew of STS-119 Discovery on March 28, 2009, after having spent 134 days in orbit. She was assigned to the crew of STS-135, the final mission of the Space Shuttle. She is also a licensed amateur radio operator with the call sign KE5FYE. From 2012 until 2018 Magnus was the executive director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.
Astronauts roundtable : Can astronauts challenge time?
21 novembre 2019 10:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
The countdown starts early. At the beginning of the selection to become an astronaut, or even as soon as the idea of ​​making the trip out of the atmosphere crosses the mind of the candidate. Everything is then linked, step by step, success after success, until the ultimate consecration when the contender is part of the team, the one that brings together extraordinary human beings, ready to follow the training mission for an adventure into space. Many months of intensive preparation, with a meticulously planned program, still separate the future hero from the last seconds of the countdown. The astronaut has to keep making progress every day. A few hours before they take off, the crew are placed into quarantine. On the launching ramp, curled up in their seats, they will be propelled into space within the deadline imposed by the launching procedure. In less than nine minutes, they will travel at an orbital speed of 28,000 km / h and will pass around the Earth 16 times each day. The real mission has just begun. Whether it is to ensure proper operation of the instruments, to repair them, to carry out scientific experiments, to communicate with Earth, to interact with their teammates, to sleep, to eat, the astronauts evolve at a certain pace, a pace which is imposed upon them by the trials of space. Although they are very busy, the return to Earth, close to where their loved ones reside can sometimes seem so far away. At each stage, even during an extravehicular exit or the return trip to Earth: is it possible for astronauts to challenge time?
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Sarah Chenaf Sarah Chenaf
violist
Show : TimeWorldNight

Sarah Chenaf first studied viola at the conservatory in Bordeaux, before enrolling in the Conservatoire national supérieur de musique de Paris, where she obtained her master’s degree. She then continued her training in Vienna and Hanover with Johannes Meissl and Hatto Beyerle. In 2009, she co-founded the Zaïde quartet with Charlotte Maclet, Leslie Boulin-Raulet on violin, and Juliette Salmona on cello. Zaïde has won a number of competitions and performs internationally. In fall 2017, the quartet produced its third album inspired by French music. Sarah Chenaf is a resident of the Singer-Polignac Foundation.
Show : TimeWorldNight
23 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
What if we took Arnold Schoenberg for his word? ‘The transfigured night’ was inspired by Richard Dehmel’s poem. Wouldn’t it be more spectacular if we only had our ears to receive its beauty? After the poem being read in darkness, the audience would hear Schoenberg’s masterpiece in its sextet string version in the shade. This setting would allow the audience to experience the piece in a new way. A light projection will display dark colours to recreate a night atmosphere. The musicians will exist through their voice and the sound of their instruments. This experiment has never been made before because the six musicians will have to play by heart, with no partition or music stand. ‘The transfigured night’ was created between Germanic Romantism of the XIXth century’s and the modernism Shonenberg and its two disciples Berg and Webern established. Interpreted by Ana Millet, Juliette Salmona, Corentin Bordelot, David Haroutunian, Pauline Bartissol, Sarah Chanaf. Reading by Simon Abkarian.
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Simon Abkarian Simon Abkarian
Author, film director, actor
Show : TimeWorldNight

Born in Gonesse, Val d'Oise, of Armenian descent, Abkarian spent his childhood in Lebanon. He moved to Los Angeles, where he joined an Armenian theater company managed by Gerald Papazian. He returned to France in 1985, settling in Paris. He took classes at the Acting International school, then he joined Ariane Mnouchkine's Théâtre du Soleil and played, among others, in L'Histoire terrible mais inachevée de Norodom Sihanouk, roi du Cambodge. In 2001 he starred in Beast on the Moon by Richard Kalinoski, a play about the life of a survivor of the Armenian Genocide, a role which won him critical acclaim and the Molière Award for Best Actor. His first roles in cinema were proposed by French filmmaker Cédric Klapisch, who asked him to play in several of his movies, notably in Chacun cherche son chat (1996) and in Ni pour ni contre (bien au contraire) in 2003. He was featured in Sally Potter's Yes (2004), in which he played the lead role. Abkarian then played Mehdi Ben Barka in the thriller J'ai vu tuer Ben Barka by Serge Le Péron. He then played in Prendre Femme by Ronit Elkabetz which won him several acting awards. He has also appeared in Atom Egoyan's Ararat (2002), he was Albert in Almost Peaceful (2004) by French director Michel Deville, and he was featured in Your Dreams (2005) by Denis Thybaud. He was featured as Sahak in the thriller Les Mauvais Joueurs (2005) by Frédéric Balekdjian. He played the role of villain Alex Dimitrios in the James Bond film, Casino Royale. He has also been the voice of Ebi in the French version of the animated feature Persepolis. Abkarian played the role of the Armenian poet Missak Manouchian in The Army of Crime (2010) by Robert Guédiguian. He has also played Dariush Bakhshi, the Iranian Special Consul, in the BBC drama Spooks (MI-5). In 2012, he played the role of a drug-dealing Afghan army colonel in the Canal+ series Kaboul Kitchen.
Show : TimeWorldNight
23 novembre 2019 18:00 - Amphi Gaston Berger
What if we took Arnold Schoenberg for his word? ‘The transfigured night’ was inspired by Richard Dehmel’s poem. Wouldn’t it be more spectacular if we only had our ears to receive its beauty? After the poem being read in darkness, the audience would hear Schoenberg’s masterpiece in its sextet string version in the shade. This setting would allow the audience to experience the piece in a new way. A light projection will display dark colours to recreate a night atmosphere. The musicians will exist through their voice and the sound of their instruments. This experiment has never been made before because the six musicians will have to play by heart, with no partition or music stand. ‘The transfigured night’ was created between Germanic Romantism of the XIXth century’s and the modernism Shonenberg and its two disciples Berg and Webern established. Interpreted by Ana Millet, Juliette Salmona, Corentin Bordelot, David Haroutunian, Pauline Bartissol, Sarah Chanaf. Reading by Simon Abkarian.
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Stéphane Durand Stéphane Durand
Theoretical Physicist
Conference : Can we control the flow of time?

Stéphane Durand completed doctoral and post-doctoral studies in theoretical physics in Montreal and Paris. He is a professor of physics at Collège Édouard-Montpetit and a member of the Center de recherches mathématiques (CRM) of the Université de Montréal. He has also taught quantum mechanics and relativity at the Department of Physics at the Université de Montréal and École Polytechnique de Montréal. He received the Quebec Minister of Education Award for his book "La relativité animée : Comprendre Einstein en animant soi-même l'espace-temps" (3rd edition, Belin, 2014). He received an Excellence in Teaching Award from the Department of Physics at the Université de Montréal, as well as the First Prize in the International Poster Competition of the European Mathematical Society as part of the World Mathematics Year (posters used and adapted in a dozen countries). He has also published the book "Les hérésies scientifiques du professeur Durand" (Flammarion, 2015), inspired by his 150 radio chronicles on Radio-Canada during 4 seasons. Recently, he designed a mini-exhibition on "Time according to relativity", an integral part of the exhibition "Eternity: human dreams and realities of science" presented at the Saguenay Fjord Museum in 2017.
Conference : Can we control the flow of time?
23 novembre 2019 15:30 - Amphi Louis Armand
One of the most extraordinary scientific ideas of all times, verified experimentally, is that the flow of time is malleable and can be controlled. This is one of the most striking consequences of the theory of relativity. After presenting this phenomenon, as well as some paradoxes of relativity, we will show how they are explained intuitively using the concept of space-time. The latter is not just a banal juxtaposition of space and time. On the contrary, it is an intimate and profound fusion, which allows the partial transformation of space in time, and vice versa.
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Sylvain Briens Sylvain Briens
Professor
Conference : Are Innovations Always Avant-Garde?

Sylvain Briens is a professor at Sorbonne University, an essayist, and a musician. After a career as an engineer in telecommunications and at the United Nations, he taught Scandinavian language, literature, and civilization at the University of Strasbourg and the Paris-Sorbonne University. His research focuses on Scandinavian culture and links between technical innovation and literature.
Conference : Are Innovations Always Avant-Garde?
21 novembre 2019 14:00 - Amphi Louis Armand
An examination of avant-garde movements shows that innovation emerges as part of a recent past and also draws inspiration from archaic myths and sources. Like the Angel of History (painted by Paul Klee) who turns his back on the future to contemplate the ruins of the past at his feet, the posture of the innovator is turned toward a future that he cannot grasp, while his face looks back at the past. So, from Surrealism to string theory, telecommunications to serialism, the forces of innovation are neither linear nor homogenous; instead, they appear in transdisciplinary cycles, creating unanticipated and dynamic connections based on existing practices. Weaving together a network of novel potentialities, they shape the contours of time.
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Thierry Harvey Thierry Harvey
Obstetrician
Conference : Can We Change the Gestation Period?

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Conference : Can We Change the Gestation Period?
23 novembre 2019 11:30 - Amphi Louis Armand
9 months is long and short. Is the time between conception and birth set in stone? In the Napoleonic Code of 1804, a child was potentially viable at 6 months. Since then, things have more or less changed. In France, the gestation period is 9 months. In the rest of the world, it is defined as 40 weeks of amenorrhea. Medical advances in neonatology in the 1980s succeeded in reducing viability times to less than 6 months, though without a formal status. In 1993, the World Health Organization set the threshold for viability at 22 weeks of amenorrhea and a weight of 500 grams (just over a pound). Is this a utopia or a reality? Is gestation set in stone? Or does it vary from one woman, one pregnancy, and one fetus to another? Can we – or should we – attempt to shorten gestation? And for whose benefit? These are pressing health questions for future generations.
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Valentin Metillon Valentin Metillon
Student
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?

After studying physics and philosophy of science, Valentin Métillon has begun a PhD thesis in quantum physics at the Kastler-Brossel Laboratory (Collège de France, Paris) about quantum measurement and entanglement. More widely, he is interested in the question of time measurement in physics and the diffusion of scientific and technical knowledges.
Students roundtable : Going faster, will it allow us to gain time?
23 novembre 2019 14:45 - Amphi Gaston Berger
Our daily life seems to be articulated around omnipresent accelerations. Automated transports, automatic correctors, search engines, notifications... We are used to knowing the result of a crucial election in real time, we can even automatically replay the crucial goal of a thrilling match online within seconds. Access to information is so rapid that the distance from events to the present seems to be fading away and the length of time that separates us from events in the near future seems to be shrinking. The digital even proposes to accelerate our private lives by organizing romantic meetings in one click! But does speeding up really save time? This is the question that six students will discuss at this roundtable. Their goal will be to highlight the relationship millennials maintain within our current society and impact of the quickening pace it imposes on us.
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Virginie van Wassenhove Virginie van Wassenhove
Neurosciences Researcher
Conference : Is the time of consciousness consciousness of time?

Virginie van Wassenhove received her PhD in Neurosciences and Cognitive Sciences (NACS program, 2004) at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP) under the direction of Prof David Poeppel and Dr Ken W. Grant. During her graduate training, she focused on the perception (psychophysics) and cortical bases (MEEG, fMRI) of audiovisual speech as a specific case of multisensory integration and predictive coding. In 2005, she worked with Prof Srikantan Nagarajan (UCSF) on learning and plasticity in audition and in audiovisual perception with combined psychophysics and MEG. From 2006 to 2008, she was implicated in various projects at UCLA (Dr Ladan Shams, Dr Dean Buonomano) and at Caltech (Prof Shinsuke Shimojo) which included implicit multisensory statistical learning, time perception, gesture communication, and interpersonal interactions. Late 2008, she joined the Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit directed by Prof Stanislas Dehaene to build NeuroSpin MEG. In 2012, she became an INSERM group leader of the Brain Dynamics research team. In 2013, she obtained her HDR (Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches; highest degree achievable in France) and became CEA Director of Research (DR). Her research interests focus on temporal cognition and multisensory integration.
Conference : Is the time of consciousness consciousness of time?
22 novembre 2019 09:15 - Amphi Gaston Berger
The beings of emotion and thought that we are are talking about time and its arrow, the time that passes, the time lived, the time that lasts, the time that sways the measure, and sometimes even future time. The human is endowed with an arrow of time, linear, on which he arranges, as a measure of future memories and anticipations, the events of his life and those of his great history. All these faculties of intelligible representation of time do not capture the emergent temporal dimension that physics describes, but psychological realities of conscious time that rely on the functioning of our brain interfacing with a rich universe of information in motion. And yet, the complex dynamic system of our brain evolves over time (physics), and has observable, measurable, and quantifiable temporal properties. Do the dynamic properties of brain activity that we inscribe on an arrow of time describe conscious time? In other words, is the time of consciousness also the consciousness of time?
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Xavier Emmanuelli Xavier Emmanuelli
Emergency doctor
Conference : How can we take the measure of medical emergency?

Xavier Emmanuelli graduated as a doctor of merchant medicine and joined the maritime courier. Then he became a general practitioner at the Coal Basin of the Freyming-Merlebach Mines. At the same time, he became part of the founding team of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), with a desire to create an international emergency relief effort. In parallel, from 1972 to 1975, he was the assistant to Professor Pierre Huguenard for the creation and development of SAMU 94, one of the first Emergency Medical Aid Services. As an anesthesiologist and reanimator. From 1992 to 1995 Xavier Emmanuelli was a hospital practitioner at the Care and Accommodation Center at the Nanterre hospital. He described a new clinical approach to social exclusion observed during consultations with the homeless. He then imagined a social SAMU like the medical SAMU in order to take charge of people in situations of exclusion. From 1995 to 1997, he was appointed Secretary of State for Emergency Humanitarian Action by President Jacques Chirac. In 1998, he also founded the Samusocial International, in order to address the high levels of exclusion amongst homeless people in big cities of the world.
Conference : How can we take the measure of medical emergency?
21 novembre 2019 15:30 - Amphi Louis Armand
In response of each phase of the disease, the doctor adapts his strategy. He is sometimes confronted with serious situations, relative emergencies, and even absolute emergencies, where life is at stake. The time that passes then is that of immediacy, the first minutes of medical care. The doctor must decide and act without delay. That is the short time he has before the patient’s condition becomes irreversible. In other cases, the disease leads the doctor to work for a long time, when the disease breaks out and the symptoms appear, then during the stabilization and treatment period. Medical time is constantly measuring the degree of urgency and adapting to it, in order to prolong as well as possible the one we have left.
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Yann Mambrini Yann Mambrini
Theoretical Physicist
Conference : Can we measure time?

Yann Mambrini is director of Research in the CNRS and member of the scientific council of the CNRS. He is professor in University of Paris-Saclay and associate professor in University of Madrid. His research activities are concentrated on the Early Universe Cosmology, especially dark matter production after Inflation. He is working on space and time geometry, in the context of String Theories and Supergravity. He is the authors of more than 100 articles in international reviews, member of the Conseil de Laboratoire and Conseil de Pilotage of the University Paris-Saclay, awarded by several international grants.
Conference : Can we measure time?
22 novembre 2019 09:15 - Amphi Louis Armand
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Yannick Lebtahi Yannick Lebtahi
Semiologist, media analyst
Conference : Is an Apocalypse Possible?

Yannick Lebtahi is a semiologist, media analyst, and documentary filmmaker. Her work primarily deals with cinema, television, and the role of images in the modern world. She is a lecturer and researcher in information and communication sciences at the University of Lille. She is a member of the GERIICO laboratory in Lille (Interdisciplinary Research Group on Information and Communication) and an associate member of the Centre d’Étude sur les Images et les Sons Médiatiques (Research Center on Media Images and Sounds). She is the expert and editorial director of Cahiers Interdisciplinaires de la Recherche en Communication Audio Visuelle and the director of the DeVisu collection at L’Harmattan publishing.
Conference : Is an Apocalypse Possible?
23 novembre 2019 16:45 - Amphi Louis Armand
Imagined Y2K scenarios were inspiration for innovative film productions: ten young filmmakers from ten different countries were each asked to make a movie featuring the night of December 31, 1999 and the fears and fantasies it engendered. For France, the filmmaker Laurent Cantet wove together metaphorical images in a mise an abyme with Les Sanguinaires. A play on the notion of the screen, the film puts into perspective the “objective” time of celebration. Rejecting the festivities, the main character, François, searches for existential meaning. The film shows his experience of time as he grapples with unfathomable melancholy. Presented with their fears and doubts, viewers project themselves into a hypothetical, pre-programmed apocalypse as they watch François lose his grip on reality. The film further presents the potential apocalypse as a total erasure of individuality. The end of Les Sanguinaires remains open and ambiguous on the fate of the main character and forces viewers to consider the meaning of their own existence in the face of death.
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